x
Gigabit

FCC Rules Out!

The most widely anticipated government document since the Magna Carta has been released by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Okay, so maybe it's not quite that important. But the FCC's final report for its Triennial Review, which is officially entitled "Review of the Section 251 Unbundling Obligations of Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers; Implement of the Local Competition Provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 1996; Deployment of Wireline Services Offering Advanced Telecommunications Capability; Appropriate Framework for Broadband Access to the Internet over Wireline Facilities," have kept telecom industry mavens (and mostly lawyers) in limbo for six months after originally being promised in March 2003.

They've just been released by the FCC, and can be found here.

So what's it all mean? Well, the FCC took six months to put it all together... so you'll have to give us at least 12 hours to put together some analysis. In the morning we'll probably be greeted with a fresh round of press releases as telecom companies and industry groups react. Some of the FCC board members have already publicized their own takes. For political pomp and circumstance, the individual statements by FCC board members can be read here.

The long-awaited document was originally supposed to be published in March after the board's rulemaking meeting in February, but, alas, the civil servants took a little longer than anticipated to cook it up. And though some horror stories about its projected length (800 pages -- gasp!) were a tad overboard, it appears to have weighed in at a respectable 576 pages (See Is the FCC on Holiday?, The FCC Waiting Game, and New FCC Rules: 600 Pages? )

— R. Scott Raynovich, US Editor, Light Reading
http://www.lightreading.com
lastmile 12/4/2012 | 11:32:16 PM
re: FCC Rules Out! It just means that everything FTT(H,P,X) will be spared from line sharing rules.
The other rules concerning voice/narrowband are way too complicated and we need BOBBYMAX to help us out.
EOM
rjmcmahon 12/4/2012 | 11:32:06 PM
re: FCC Rules Out! The words of the day seem to be "regulatory certainty." I believe it means more pain ahead and the cancer is spreading. An FCC change needs to occur.
Ramu3 12/4/2012 | 11:32:03 PM
re: FCC Rules Out! re: It just means that everything FTT(H,P,X) will be spared from line sharing rules.

If it were anything close to that trivial and clear-cut, it wouldn't have taken nearly 600 pages to lay it out.
optical_man 12/4/2012 | 11:32:00 PM
re: FCC Rules Out! Gov't: Nice Title. Typical of any arm of gov't.

"Review of the Section 251 Unbundling Obligations of Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers; Implement of the Local Competition Provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 1996; Deployment of Wireline Services Offering Advanced Telecommunications Capability; Appropriate Framework for Broadband Access to the Internet over Wireline Facilities"


My read?: Same thing as stated in March.
UNE-P stays, CLEC's happy, RBOC's not.

Broadband belongs to RBOC's, and those who actually invest (yes that means spend cash) in infrastructure. RBOC's happy. CLEC's not.

Result: Circuit switches die off sooner, get turned over to CLEC's. RBOC's begin delivering Voice/Video/Data over broadband infrastructure via investing time, energy, CASH. (Vendors make money!) RBOC's reclaim monopoly on communications, at the same time evolve into 'home entertainment delivery vehicles'. Microsoft/AOL/Yahoo buy, or are bought by, RBOC's to complete the picture.

lastmile 12/4/2012 | 11:32:00 PM
re: FCC Rules Out! "If it were anything close to that trivial and clear-cut, it wouldn't have taken nearly 600 pages to lay it out"

When it comes to fiber all the way to the user the rules are very clear. The rules say "Do it if you want and no one will trouble you" This clear-cut rule is less than one page long.

The other 575 pages address local phone and broadband competition issues, including previous Unbundled Network Elements (UNE) rules that had been overturned last year by the U.S. Court of Appeals.
whyiswhy 12/4/2012 | 11:31:54 PM
re: FCC Rules Out! Most
importantly, I am troubled that we are undermining competition in the broadband market by
limitingGă÷on a nationwide basis in all markets for all customersGă÷competitorsGăÍ access to
broadband loop facilities whenever an incumbent deploys a mixed fiber/copper loop. In essence,
as incumbents deploy fiber anywhere in their loop plant, they are relieved of the unbundling
obligations that Congress imposed to ensure adequate competition in the local market. The
majority assures us that by somehow ignoring the intent of Congress and tearing away the
infrastructure that undergirds competition, this will promote investment in advanced
architectures. Rather than Găúnew wires, new rules,Găą I fear the majority adopts a system of Găúno
rules, old monopolies.Găą This is not a brave new world of broadband, but simply the old system
of local monopoly dressed up in a digital cloak.


IOW, all the RBOCs have to do is run a short fiber from one rack to another, and as long as the fiber carries multimedia (equals broadband loop?), they own everything downstream. If the CLECs bitch too much about that game, they will run a slightly longer fiber to a neighborhood aggregator.

CLECs: Game over dudes....maybe not tomorrow, but soon.

FO vendors: get ready to play hardball with a consortium negotiating the lowest prices you ever dreamed you migh have to offer...then squeeze again. But someone will get an order...

Consumers: get out your wallets and open them for RBOC inspection!

-Why
PackMan 12/4/2012 | 11:31:50 PM
re: FCC Rules Out! I think it's funny that everyone who laments the demise of the CLECs, supposedly due to the fiber ruling, and slams the RBOCS as being non-competitive, seems to conveniently forget wireless, satellite, and cable. Oh, and the PUCs. Um... hello McFly!!!
Y2KickIT 12/4/2012 | 11:31:40 PM
re: FCC Rules Out! At the risk of being redundant
1. As said on previous post
http://www.lightreading.com/bo...
"if the interpretation runs in their favor, if adding fiber allows them not to share, look for fiber in the loop, no matter how short."

2. There is no effective intermodal competition.

3. Wireless, Satellite? Weren't we talking broadband, not fraudband?

4. RBOCs don't have the cash to build it everywhere, maybe not even all greenfields, but they can use the rule to cut off copper from the CLECs and DLECs.

5. Meanwhile Japan has 40 Mbps DSL selling for $35 and over 450,000 FTTH subscribers growing fast with 60,000 added in June alone.

6. We get son of project pronto.
opto 12/4/2012 | 11:31:31 PM
re: FCC Rules Out! > fiber in the loop: not all CLECs are afraid to actually invest in the local loop. Those that do invest in their own facilities have been, and now, will continue to be, true value-added competition benefitting end use customers. The useless resellers who were never real competition will go away. Won't miss 'em.
> RBOC's will now have to stop whining about not being incentivized to invest in the residential loop. But keep in mind that PUC's will still be watching carefully to make sure they are not making unwise investments just for the sake of fiber. Overcoming the tremendous lead Cable has on BOTH video and data will be hard for them to do with good business results that will keep PUC's off their backs, (keep them off ratepayers backs). And to show that FTT(x) is an appropriate investment, they will have to learn to run a broadband business, something they have been unable to do so far. That means multiple services - phone, video, and data. This WILL be interesting...
> The very, very good news for RBOCs is that Cable, in order to compete against satellite, is fast evolving to a switched content delivery vehicle. The standard will become Anything On Demand. FTTx is better suited to this world where broadcast video revenues start to shrink as a % of total video revenue mix.


RBOCs now have a chance to avoid extinction in the residential. Be interesting to see if they can figure it out this time...
HOME
Sign In
SEARCH
CLOSE
MORE
CLOSE