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NFV Strategies

Slideshow21st Century Networking? Welcome to the Lock-In

Network operators will struggle to find a 'Get out of lock-in free!' card once they're trapped behind vendor bars.
Network operators will struggle to find a 'Get out of lock-in free!' card once they're trapped behind vendor bars.

Joe Stanganelli 2/25/2018 | 10:22:50 PM
lock-in "our industry forgot about the importance of standards."

I suspect that this is less the case compared to the notion that too much emphasis was placed on standards such that the over-hyped importance began to get ignored -- because of so many competing standards. Nowadays, standards bodies are treated more like their own businesses. They more resemble partner vendors more than they are like traditional industry standards.

Or, put another way, every business is for profit.
aleforcina 2/21/2018 | 12:42:43 PM
The value of Standards Dear Steve,

you are 100% right. I "played" a lot in the old standard world (ITU/ETSI) with different responsiblities and roles. 

That world was not at all perfect and derserved a deep renovation, but today there is NOTHING.

We are moving from the old hw-based vendor lock-in to the new sw-based vendor lock-in

Regards, Alex

 
brooks7 2/21/2018 | 11:29:15 AM
Re: Safety lock Dennis,

Open Source projects die as well.  There are many completely dead ones out there including many where technology stabilized for 5+ years and people abandoned the project.  Then you have new projects that you have to adapt to.  So just being in Open Source does not guarantee continuity of supply.

What I think is actually desired is to specify a number of components that have the exact same interface and behavior.  Then have these provided by multiple sources for free.  I just don't see how that works for vendors.

seven

 
mendyk 2/20/2018 | 3:00:02 PM
Safety lock I wonder how important the idea of open systems is to network operators. Given the choice. maybe operators would prefer to do business with a vendor that isn't going to disappear at some point rather than take on the responsibility for implementing open systems. At this point, though, there are very few reasonably sure bets regarding vendor survival. Which means operators may have no choice but to embrace the open.
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