Sponsored By

NanoOpto Samples Wafers

Announces sampling of its polarization management family of subwavelength optical elements

March 4, 2002

2 Min Read

SOMERSET, N.J. -- NanoOpto Corp., which is applying proprietary nano-optics and nano-manufacturing technology to design and make components for optical networking, announced today availability of samples of its polarization management family of optical subcomponents. The first three products in this family are the NanoWave(TM) Polarizer, the NanoWave(TM) Polarization Beam Splitter (PBS), and the NanoWave(TM) Polarization Beam Combiner (PBC). Preliminary engineering samples have been shared with select customers for the past several months."NanoOpto's polarization management SOEs are the initial realization of a breakthrough technology and product platform for the creation of optical components," states Barry Weinbaum, CEO and President of NanoOpto. "Designed for integration, both with other optical component technologies and between SOEs themselves, these devices lead to reductions in both overall system costs and manufacturing costs. This is true disruptive technology delivered non-disruptively in a way to assure ease of application. We are excited to be already engaged with customers in defining the detailed requirements for our next wave of devices."In a separate release:NanoOpto Corp., which is applying proprietary nano-optics and nano-manufacturing technology to design and make components for optical networking, announced today the establishment of initial production capabilities at its Somerset, NJ, nano-fabrication facility. This enables scalable, high volume production of the company's line of subwavelength optical components, the first group of which, for polarization management, is now available for general sampling. NanoOpto's nano-manufacturing technologies and the subwavelength optical elements created using it are the realization of 20 years of research by its principal founder and Chairman, Dr. Stephen Chou. "Nano-optics, or the use of subwavelength optical elements (SOEs), entails interaction with light based on entirely new physical principles. This allows optical processing to occur on a much smaller scale and to perform new functions that bulk optics cannot," says Dr. Chou. "Many researchers have seen the commercial potential of SOEs. But what has been missing is the ability to make them in a scalable, high-speed manufacturing process that would make SOEs broadly economical. NanoOpto's nano-manufacturing technologies, which include proprietary nano-imprint lithography techniques, are the first to achieve this. The resulting communication components on a chip manufactured in volume have revolutionary potential for the industry." NanoOpto Corp.

Subscribe and receive the latest news from the industry.
Join 62,000+ members. Yes it's completely free.

You May Also Like