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Automotive

MNOs Need to Get in the Driver's Seat

All of the arguments put forth by people who didn't want to be replaced by machines when computers started becoming common in the workplace come fresh to mind when the idea of vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology is discussed.

There's something strange about giving up some semblance of control to a computer that can better detect the likelihood of a crash and, thus, is able to brake or adjust the steering before a driver even senses that there's a problem. It's going to take quite a bit of work for cars to get there -- especially on the part of wireless providers.

For V2V to work, cars must be able to exchange safety data -- things such as speed and position -- 10 times per second, as well as send warnings to drivers if an imminent collision is sensed.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration believes that the vision of talking cars that avoid crashes is well on its way to becoming reality. V2V systems go a step further by allowing communications to take place between cars, as well as between a car and the road (picture a road sign automatically telling a car to slow down for a new speed limit).

These are some of the findings in this month's Heavy Reading Mobile Networks Insider report, "MNOs Hold the Keys to Success for Connected Cars." This report examines the connected car market, analyzing how mobile network operators (MNOs) are likely to become involved in the connected car arena, as well as areas of growth expected in the market over the next two years. It discusses drivers and challenges in the industry and includes a comparative analysis of solutions available. Finally, it examines the geographic landscape of the market and details trends that are likely to occur in the industry over the next 18-24 months.

MNOs have a terrific growth and revenue opportunity with the development of V2V technologies. If, as many suspect, President Obama makes one of his last mandates the requirement that cars be able to communicate with one another and road signs, mobile networks not only will see a surge in traffic, they will have an opportunity to prove they can deliver quality of experience like never before.

However, this is also a great opportunity for complete mayhem. If operators choose to continue bickering over every aspect of who owns what part of which network, and standardization and interoperability stagnate, it will count as one of the greatest lost opportunities that the mobile ecosystem has ever allowed.

Now, more than ever, MNOs have the chance to drive an industry. Let's hope they do so with an ear toward the Beatles' Drive My Car: "I got no car and it's breaking my heart -- but I've found a driver, and that's a start."

— Denise Culver, Research Analyst, Heavy Reading Mobile Networks Insider


The report, MNOs Hold the Keys to Success for Connected Cars, is available as part of an annual single-user subscription (six issues) to Mobile Networks Insider, priced at $1,595. Individual reports are available for $900. To subscribe, please visit: www.heavyreading.com/mobile-networks.

R Clark 6/22/2014 | 10:34:49 PM
Left at the starting line It wouldn't be like the telco operators to miss a massive business opportunity that lands on their doorstep.

 

 
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