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Equinix Unifies the Cloud With Apigee APIs

Equinix ties apps to the appropriate cloud using Apigee's API management platform.

Sarah Thomas

January 8, 2015

2 Min Read
Equinix Unifies the Cloud With Apigee APIs

Apigee and Equinix are teaming up to make sure enterprises can seamlessly access applications regardless of which cloud the applications are housed in, an important feature as enterprises increasingly use a mix of several public and private clouds,

Apigee Corp. today revealed itself to be the application programming interface (API) management company that Equinix Inc. (Nasdaq: EQIX) is using to eliminate the need for provisioning separate cross-connects in order to add cloud access in Equinix's Cloud Exchange. Equinix announced its support for APIs last week, but didn't then reveal the identity of its partner. (See Equinix Speeds Cloud Provisioning via APIs and Equinix Cloud Exchange Adds SoftLayer, APIs.)

With Apigee, enterprises and developers can connect to any of the 17 cloud service providers Equinix hosts, including Amazon Web Services Inc. , Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) Azure and Google (Nasdaq: GOOG)'s Cloud Platform. To these developers, the multiple services will look like one, unified cloud with no extra provisioning needed. (See Cloud Exchange Gathering Steam.)

Catch up on business services move to the cloud on the cloud services channel here on Light Reading.

Ed Anuff, VP of product strategy for Apigee, says the partnership fits well into increasingly software-defined data centers, but also goes deeper by enabling software-defined application architectures. By using APIs, apps have the ability to modify and define their operating environment as necessary, he explains. With Apigee Edge, the company's cloud-based API platform, Equinix can configure and manage the app interconnections to various cloud services in a way that's consistent, reliable and secure.

"SDN has always been something that Apigee has been saying you need APIs within, but not just APIs -- managed APIs and all the things they bring to bear like security, analytics and the optimization of API usage," Anuff says.

— Sarah Reedy, Senior Editor, Light Reading

About the Author(s)

Sarah Thomas

Director, Women in Comms

Sarah Thomas's love affair with communications began in 2003 when she bought her first cellphone, a pink RAZR, which she duly "bedazzled" with the help of superglue and her dad.

She joined the editorial staff at Light Reading in 2010 and has been covering mobile technologies ever since. Sarah got her start covering telecom in 2007 at Telephony, later Connected Planet, may it rest in peace. Her non-telecom work experience includes a brief foray into public relations at Fleishman-Hillard (her cussin' upset the clients) and a hodge-podge of internships, including spells at Ingram's (Kansas City's business magazine), American Spa magazine (where she was Chief Hot-Tub Correspondent), and the tweens' quiz bible, QuizFest, in NYC.

As Editorial Operations Director, a role she took on in January 2015, Sarah is responsible for the day-to-day management of the non-news content elements on Light Reading.

Sarah received her Bachelor's in Journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia. She lives in Chicago with her 3DTV, her iPad and a drawer full of smartphone cords.

Away from the world of telecom journalism, Sarah likes to dabble in monster truck racing, becoming part of Team Bigfoot in 2009.

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