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Forget Apple. There's no wilder story in the world of pay-TV than the controversy surrounding Omniverse One World Television. In this podcast, we discuss how the company turned up on the cable industry's radar, scrapped with content owners and has what it said is a 100-year contract to distribute pay-TV channels.

Phil Harvey

March 29, 2019

2 Min Read
Podcast: Into the Omniverse

On this week's podcast, we go into the Omniverse!

Light Reading Senior Editor Jeff Baumgartner reviews his reporting on the surprising story of Omniverse One World Television, an over-the-top (OTT) distributor of live pay-TV channels to all kinds of competitive players.

The Omniverse pitch, which offers hundreds of channels from all the major broadcast networks -- all with no contracts, no credit checks and no long-term obligations.

This fits the bill for what cord cutters need to leave their traditional cable service behind -- all the channels they would normally see on cable TV available, on any device, at a fraction of the cost of cable TV.

Is it all too good to be true? What does Omniverse say about its business model? And what surprising deal hangs in the balance as possibly the key to its competitive future?

No need to wonder, "What's up, danger?" We're talking about Omniverse One World Television.

Do you have a question or complaint that we should address on a future podcast? Leave it below on the message boards or send us an email.

The Light Reading podcast is available on Google Play, Apple Podcasts, Spotify and SoundCloud.

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Phil Harvey, US Bureau Chief, Light Reading

About the Author(s)

Phil Harvey

Editor-in-Chief, Light Reading

Phil Harvey has been a Light Reading writer and editor for more than 18 years combined. He began his second tour as the site's chief editor in April 2020.

His interest in speed and scale means he often covers optical networking and the foundational technologies powering the modern Internet.

Harvey covered networking, Internet infrastructure and dot-com mania in the late 90s for Silicon Valley magazines like UPSIDE and Red Herring before joining Light Reading (for the first time) in late 2000.

After moving to the Republic of Texas, Harvey spent eight years as a contributing tech writer for D CEO magazine, producing columns about tech advances in everything from supercomputing to cellphone recycling.

Harvey is an avid photographer and camera collector – if you accept that compulsive shopping and "collecting" are the same.

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