& cplSiteName &

Sigfox Plans 20 Cent Disposable Radio for IoT

Dan Jones
10/13/2017
100%
0%

Sigfox, the French startup that has a low-power IoT network in 36 countries, is working on an ultra-cheap disposable radio that is expected to be commercially available next year.

The "Admiral Ivory" product -- using Sigfox 's low-power WAN technology -- will be a very low-cost chip for tracking applications and will cost "in the range of 20 cents," says to Sigfox's chief marketing officer, Laetitia Jay.

"There are plenty of opportunities in the postal market," Jay adds. Essentially, a letter or package could be tracked to delivery via the chip.

The Office of Inspector General at the United States Postal Service put out a paper on developing an Internet of Postal Things (IoPT) in 2015. In it, the department cites Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO) data saying public sector IoT could yield $4.6 trillion in value by 2022.

By comparison with the 20 cent chip, Jay says, Sigfox's existing module -- designed for very long-battery life applications -- is priced around $3. LTE-M modules are currently priced around $7.50.

Silicon based on unlicensed spectrum typically cost less than licensed systems. Sigfox currently lists nine chip manufacturers as delivering modules or transcievers based on its technology, these include heavy hitters like Texas Instruments Inc. (NYSE: TXN) and STMicroelectronics NV (NYSE: STM).

The Sigfox set-up is much different from the RFID tags that some organizations use to track packages today. For one, Sigfox networks, which use the unlicensed ISM band (915MHz in the US), have a coverage range of five to 30 miles, depending on network topology. RFID tags have a radio range of between five and 15 meters, depending on the generation of silicon being used.

Much of the early coverage of Sigfox has placed the company in opposition to cellular LTE standards such as LTE-M. This is is not the case at all, Jay says.(See Could LTE-M Torpedo NB-IoT?)

"There is a true and proven complementarity between cellular LTE-M and Sigfox," says Jay.

In fact, she notes that Sigfox customer, Securitas, is rolling out alarm panels with voice activation using LTE-M that have Sigfox onboard too as a last line of defense if burglars attempt to jam the 4G LTE connection.

— Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, Light Reading

(3)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
kq4ym
50%
50%
kq4ym,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/26/2017 | 9:30:13 AM
Re: Use Case
Yes, it would seem the post office and other shippers could certainly be a huge market for such inexpensive tracking devices. I wonder what other IoT device applications could benefit from these new chips?
drlal@viciinc.com
50%
50%
[email protected],
User Rank: Lightning
10/24/2017 | 2:07:13 PM
Amazing !
A true gamechanger ! Can't beat a 20 cent Disposable Radio stuck on throwaway IoT's !
danielcawrey
50%
50%
danielcawrey,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/13/2017 | 3:08:10 PM
Use Case
There certainly is a use case for this. I would think things like expensive items that are small and could be stolen would have one of these devices attached. It's a better option than RFID given its distance limitations. 
Featured Video
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
April 8, 2019, Las Vegas, Nevada
May 6, 2019, Denver, Colorado
May 6-8, 2019, Denver, Colorado
September 17-19, 2019, Dallas, Texas
October 1, 2019, New Orleans, Louisiana
October 2-22, 2019, Los Angeles, CA
October 10, 2019, New York, New York
November 5, 2019, London, England
November 7, 2019, London, UK
December 3-5, 2019, Vienna, Austria
December 3, 2019, New York, New York
All Upcoming Live Events
Partner Perspectives - content from our sponsors
Huawei Shows 5G in Action at MWC
By Ken Wieland, for Huawei
Huawei Heats Up Microwave for 5G Backhaul
By Ken Wieland, for Huawei
Huawei Services Bring the Best 5G Into Reality
By Steven Wu, President of Consulting & Service Solution Sales Dept., Carrier BG, Huawei
All Partner Perspectives