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Verizon Reserves Special Tiers for Big Spenders

If you love your data, Verizon Wireless has more options for you in the form of five bonus data tiers on top of the six it announced with its a Share Everything plans earlier this summer. (See Verizon: One Data Bucket to Rule Them All.)

The extra gigabytes will cost you, however, as much as US$150 per month for 20GB of data. These tiers aren't detailed on the carrier's website, but rather offered on an as-needed basis. The plans, first uncovered by CNET, over and above the six choices Verizon lists online include:
  • 12GB for $110/month
  • 14GB for $120/month
  • 16GB for $130/month
  • 18GB for $140/month
  • 20GB for $150/month


AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) also announced this week that its shared data plans would go into effect on Aug. 23. The carrier offers a 20GB plan for $200 per month, as well as a 15GB plan for $160. (See AT&T Joins Verizon in the Shared Data Pool.)

Why this matters
The wireless operators are trying to keep their plans as simple as possible, while also offering their customers several options in lieu of unlimited plans. 20GB may seem like a lot of data, but Verizon's plans are shared across 10 devices, which makes hitting that cap more likely. It will be a learning process for consumers to strike a balance between the lowest-cost plan to meet their needs but one that won't rack up the overages.

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— Sarah Reedy, Senior Reporter, Light Reading Mobile

sarahthomas1011 12/5/2012 | 5:24:27 PM
re: Verizon Reserves Special Tiers for Big Spenders

I bet business accounts would be interested in the higher tiers. I get the simplicity thing, but not listing them might make some opt for AT&T, which charges a lot more for the same level of data.

shygye75 12/5/2012 | 5:24:24 PM
re: Verizon Reserves Special Tiers for Big Spenders

How or why is this preferable to a simple metered plan, as in you pay every month for what you use? Other utilities seem to use this model quite well.

grunt 12/5/2012 | 5:24:20 PM
re: Verizon Reserves Special Tiers for Big Spenders

I suppose to the carrier the 'tier' approach is better than linear meter because they nail customers on overages.  To the users - I don't really see any reason tiers are better - unless perhaps they are coupled with carry over and non-linear pricing per bit..


Im still pretty unclear on how much raw BW usage increases cost to the carriers.  It seems like BW usage at peak times is what drive network investment needs - so it feels like if the carriers want to be honest about this they need to transition to 'smart' meter which would charge more depending on the time or even on network usage at that time etc..  That would be a bit complicated for the customers though.  Same seems true with broadband - and what should really be worth some cash is QoS at those peak times..

grunt 12/5/2012 | 5:24:20 PM
re: Verizon Reserves Special Tiers for Big Spenders

I suppose to the carrier the 'tier' approach is better than linear meter because they nail customers on overages.  To the users - I don't really see any reason tiers are better - unless perhaps they are coupled with carry over and non-linear pricing per bit..


Im still pretty unclear on how much raw BW usage increases cost to the carriers.  It seems like BW usage at peak times is what drive network investment needs - so it feels like if the carriers want to be honest about this they need to transition to 'smart' meter which would charge more depending on the time or even on network usage at that time etc..  That would be a bit complicated for the customers though.  Same seems true with broadband - and what should really be worth some cash is QoS at those peak times..

shygye75 12/5/2012 | 5:24:19 PM
re: Verizon Reserves Special Tiers for Big Spenders

I agree with you that tiered pricing -- at least the way it is described here for Verizon -- is not customer-friendly. If you pay for 16GB and use only 15, then you are overpaying. And if you pay for 16 and end up using 17, I would guess there's an overage charge. The thing that makes this really stand out is that there's no apparent per-byte price difference in the tiers. Why use tiering at all if the per-byte cost doesn't change? The logic escapes.

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