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Cable/Video

Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP

Suggestions that RBOCs aren't that anxious to deploy fiber to the premises (FTTP) are born out in Light Reading's November Research Poll on the topic. Results so far indicate:

  • Municipal providers are more likely than RBOCs and other incumbents to aggressively roll out FTTP.

  • "RBOC resistance" is cited by 24 percent of respondents as the biggest roadblock to widespread FTTP deployment in the U.S. However, high cost is considered a bigger problem by the highest proportion of respondents -- 45 percent.

  • The likelihood of RBOCs deploying widespread FTTP next year is considered "unlikely" by the highest proportion of respondents (38 percent). However 24 percent say it's "somewhat likely," and a further 21 percent say it's "highly likely."

  • Ethernet PONs (passive optical networks) and Ethernet switches garner the highest number of votes for being technologies with "the biggest positive influence on FTTP rollouts." Third-gen DLCs, cited by their vendors as a handy stepping stone towards FTTP, get a paltry 10 percent of the vote.

  • The average residential subscriber would be prepared to pay between $50 and $100 a month for triple-play voice/data/video services, according to 68 percent of respondents.

    To give your view on this topic, and to see the latest results in detail, click on this link.

    — Peter Heywood, Founding Editor, Light Reading

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    opto 12/4/2012 | 11:15:33 PM
    re: Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP Yes. DSL is a marketing stopgap. How can they be serious with a service that can only address 65% of the market? Soooo many problems with it. Not bad for quick revenue, but certainly not a long term play to save the network from competitors.

    Cable, here we come!
    diag_eng 12/4/2012 | 11:15:33 PM
    re: Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP ...why not dive into real investigative reporting? Give us some meat here. Not just: We threw this question out and here are the results. Do some work.

    I'm reading in "real" industry rags as recently as this month that the RBOC's are going to deploy FTTP for triple play purposes. Broadbannd IP is where the RBOC's are headed and it won't happen with DSL.

    bonnyman 12/4/2012 | 11:15:31 PM
    re: Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP "In the U.S., the Bells are clinging to POTS (plain old telephone service) and their elderly copper networks like precious jewels. To them, DSL (digital subscriber line) service is an even more precious, expensive offering to be served up gradually and slowly (I'm 3 miles from a central office and still waiting for it where I live.) Fiber, as noted previously, is primarily something to dangle before regulators and legislators when trying to eliminate competition."

    "In Australia, however, their counterpart Telstra has told the Australian Senate they intend to replace 100% of their copper network with fiber within 15 years, bluntly describing their copper lines as 'five minutes to midnight""

    "Telstra's representative went on to describe their DSL offering this way:
    'He said ADSL, the high-speed internet service that runs over copper wires, was the bridging broadband technology Telstra was using until it replaced the network. He described ADSL as the 'last sweat' of revenue Telstra could wring out of the 100-year-old copper wire network.'"

    http://communityfiber.blogspot...
    [email protected] 12/4/2012 | 11:15:31 PM
    re: Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP with VoIP and DSL cannibalizing long distance and data circuit revenues, the carriers better start implementing their future technologies or they will not have a future
    rjmcmahon 12/4/2012 | 11:15:30 PM
    re: Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP Sometimes so-called advanced societies are leapfrogged by the up-and-comers. This can occur when so-called "eras of contentment" takes it hold over the mass psychology. The RBOCs and Cable cos resting their laurels and using outdated technology for our communication's infrastructures are indicators of this by my judgement.

    We can, and must, do better. Unfortunately, the status quo rarely leads a society down the path of betterment, particularly when public goods and public services are in need. We'll have to find a better way, something better than a bootstrapping off fraudband technologies, if we are to remain in our leadership roles.
    lastmile 12/4/2012 | 11:15:30 PM
    re: Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP 'In Australia, however, their counterpart Telstra has told the Australian Senate they intend to replace 100% of their copper network with fiber within 15 years'

    bonnyman: Thanks for that interesting article. I was just wondering what would happen if one of our Bell's acquired an Australian telecom company a few years from now.I am sure that they would rip off all the fiber and replace it with Copper.

    The Bells love POTS (plain old telephone service) and their elderly copper networks like precious jewels.
    sevenbrooks 12/4/2012 | 11:15:28 PM
    re: Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP
    Here is the thing. Who was polled and do they matter? This poll seems to not to have any basis in reality as the only people that matter here are the ones buying the equipment. There is absolutely no way to understand if that group has any overlap with the group taking the poll.

    seven
    alchemy 12/4/2012 | 11:15:26 PM
    re: Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP When you consider the union labor costs of deploying FTTP, there ain't enough money in the world for the RBOCs to run fiber to every home in the US. If they try to contract it out, there would be a monster strike.

    Personally, I pay far more money to my wireless provider than I ever paid to my local Bell Operating Company. I pay far more money to my MSO, too. I don't see how the RBOCs are viable in the long term.
    BobbyMax 12/4/2012 | 11:15:21 PM
    re: Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP FTTP is very expensive in terms of laying fiber to the premises. The current plan of serving 32 homes from the splitter is still very expensive. The technology needs to be improved so that at least 128 homes. But even this may not be cost effective. The other possibilities such as combination of fiber and copper may help.
    bonnyman 12/4/2012 | 11:15:20 PM
    re: Poll Finds RBOCs Tepid on FTTP FTTP is very expensive in terms of laying fiber to the premises. The current plan of serving 32 homes from the splitter is still very expensive. The technology needs to be improved so that at least 128 homes. But even this may not be cost effective. The other possibilities such as combination of fiber and copper may help.

    Increasing split ratios from 32 to 128 should not change the overall economics very much.

    There would be fewer line cards in the CO but the reduction in costs would be partially offset by an increase in card complexity and speed. The units on the house might also become somewhat more expensive.

    More importantly, the outside plant costs 80% to 90%. Much of this is labor and "make-ready". Increasing the split ratio would reduce the number of fibers in the cable between the splitter and the CO, saving perhaps several hundred dollars in trunk cable cost per 128-port splitter. Spread over 128 subscribers, that's several dollars per subscriber.

    Finally, increasing the split ratio from 32 to 128 means serving more locations from one splitter and therefore longer runs downstream of the splitter (and higher costs for those cables.)

    One application where a 128 split might be desirable would be in an apartment complex; otherwise, I suspect the cons just about balance out the pros.

    A.B.
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