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Yipes Picks LuxN Gear

Light Reading
News Analysis
Light Reading
5/21/2001

LuxN Inc. has won a deal with Yipes Communications Inc., one month after it announced a multimillion dollar deal with Time Warner Inc. (NYSE: TWX) (see LuxN: New Customer, New Product).

Yipes has aggreed to buy LuxN's metro and access optical transport equipment. The decision was largely driven by LuxN's management software, the Optical Service Level Management (OSLM) platform, according to Yipes officials.

OLSM is based on what LuxN calls ColorSIM technology, a patented and proprietary scheme for taking out samples of an optical signal and monitoring the bits traveling through the connection.

Ron Young, a founder of Yipes and its chief marketing officer, says that other WDM (wavelength-division multiplexing) equipment doesn't monitor traffic once it is has been converted to light -- it has to convert it back to electrical signals to measure the bits. Constant measurement of traffic is crucial to service providers because it allows them to charge customers according to what they have used.

“Nobody else can do this. They are measuring bits on a wavelength without having to go out of band,” says Young. Terms of the deal haven’t been disclosed, but Young says the two companies have been working together for several months and will continue to jointly develop technology. Yipes, which has expanded its network to 20 cities in 21 months, will use LuxN’s WDM transport equipment, including its WS 3234 (WavStation), WS3217 (WavFarer), and WS 3208 products, to add more capacity to its regional Ethernet networks.

Yipes leases fiber from a local provider in a given market and then builds an Ethernet infrastructure using the leased fiber, which it sells as a service to customers. Until now, Yipes has not used WDM at all to add capacity. But Young says the time is approaching for Yipes to evaluate it as a way to conserve the fiber strands already on its network.

Some analysts are skeptical of LuxN's technology. "It’s hard to believe that you can measure bit error rate, when you’re not actually measuring bits,” says Ron Kline a senior analyst for optical transport with RHK Inc.. "I’ve never quite been able to grasp how LuxN is able to do it. But if it works, it is a significant breakthrough; no one else is doing this.”

Yipes is currently still testing the LuxN gear and the management platform and expects to deploy them both for commercial use by mid-year. As for LuxN’s ColorSIM technology, the company says it is looking into leasing the patent to competitors as well as testing companies.

- Marguerite Reardon, Senior Editor, Light Reading
http://www.lightreading.com

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trojanlight
trojanlight
12/4/2012 | 8:23:46 PM
re: Yipes Picks LuxN Gear
Can someone explain what colorsim is? how does this scheme differ from ONI's and CIENA's QoS methods
cable_guy
cable_guy
12/4/2012 | 8:23:42 PM
re: Yipes Picks LuxN Gear
Huh? Are they doing some sort of Q-factor or OSNR analysis? The article does a pretty lame job of explaining it. I'm sure they aren't actually measuring Bit Error Rate, but calculating it based on optical parameters.


"OLSM is based on what LuxN calls ColorSIM technology, a patented and proprietary scheme for taking out samples of an optical signal and monitoring the bits traveling through the connection.

Ron Young, a founder of Yipes and its chief marketing officer, says that other WDM (wavelength-division multiplexing) equipment doesn't monitor traffic once it is has been converted to light -- it has to convert it back to electrical signals to measure the bits. Constant measurement of traffic is crucial to service providers because it allows them to charge customers according to what they have used.

GǣNobody else can do this. They are measuring bits on a wavelength without having to go out of band,Gǥ says Young.
StartUpGuy1
StartUpGuy1
12/4/2012 | 8:23:35 PM
re: Yipes Picks LuxN Gear
ColorSIM is a method that LuxN has developed to measure real-time traffic information on a per-wavelength basis on their WDM system. It does not utilize digital wrapper and can provide a real-time look at the BER (bit error rate) for each wavelength on the system. It does not take any payload away and is non-intrusive.

In the demo I saw, they compared the statistics of the ColorSIM to a chart of the the same wavelength using a BERT (Bit Error Rate Tester). The charts were almost identical.

It is something you need to see.
trojanlight
trojanlight
12/4/2012 | 8:23:33 PM
re: Yipes Picks LuxN Gear
OpticalUser,

Your explanation of the technology is unclear; it is more marketing than a description of the technology. Will the demo you saw be in Supercomm2001?

How does this QoS compare with ONI, CIENA and Nortel's QoS?

----
ColorSIM is a method that LuxN has developed to measure real-time traffic information on a per-wavelength basis on their WDM system. It does not utilize digital wrapper and can provide a real-time look at the BER (bit error rate) for each wavelength on the system. It does not take any payload away and is non-intrusive.

----


fk
fk
12/4/2012 | 8:23:32 PM
re: Yipes Picks LuxN Gear
Bit Error Rate is not equivalent to Quality of Service. Quality of Service is a function of traffic priority and queueing; Bit Error Rate is a function of the fidelity of the (optical in this case) channel. LuxN is claiming to be able to monitor the fidelity of the optical channel entirely in the optical domain. This is, in fact, a very interesting claim. Surely there must be a patent applied for as it is unlike what anybody else is doing.
lo_mein_noodles
lo_mein_noodles
12/4/2012 | 8:23:30 PM
re: Yipes Picks LuxN Gear
Patent is not only applied for, it has been granted! Go to this link for a white paper on this technology.
http://www.luxn.com/white_pape...
crystalball
crystalball
12/4/2012 | 8:23:30 PM
re: Yipes Picks LuxN Gear
ONIS, CIEN and Nortel all dedicate full wavelengths for management out of band to my knowledge. This looks interesting but proprietary. Why not just use G.709 and increase the transponder bit rate to compensate for overhead. Are there any other advantages to the LuxN solution?
tsunami
tsunami
12/4/2012 | 8:23:29 PM
re: Yipes Picks LuxN Gear
The paper describes a technique to estimate the quality of a signal rather then a true BER. BER is a direct measurement of signal integrity while optical measurements are estimations of signal quality. Only after the optical signal is converted back to digital bits using clock recovery and retiming can the actual measurement of BER be completed. Therefore, optical estimations will never be as accurate as measured BER. This paper is another example of pseudo-science done by PR oriented companies to the detriment of carriers purchasing the equipment without adequately understanding the trade-offs. Most likely, theyGre not fooled for long.
Fred Snarff
Fred Snarff
12/4/2012 | 8:23:29 PM
re: Yipes Picks LuxN Gear
yes, very lame description of the technology. this is not a BER measurement. this is some approximation based on some analogue optical characteristic like OSNR. has to be because it's not possible to measure a BER optically because bits are digital by definition. like all optical parameters, this is analogue, and breaks down as optical impairments are introduced and/or signal power goes down.

this approach is proprietary and will be short lived. the ITU has approved the standard for optical performance measurement in DWDM networks. it is called ITU-T G.709 digital wrapper.


>>Huh? Are they doing some sort of Q-factor or OSNR analysis? The article does a pretty lame job of explaining it. I'm sure they aren't actually measuring Bit Error Rate, but calculating it based on optical parameters.


>>"OLSM is based on what LuxN calls ColorSIM technology, a patented and proprietary scheme for taking out samples of an optical signal and monitoring the bits traveling through the connection.

>>Ron Young, a founder of Yipes and its chief marketing officer, says that other WDM (wavelength-division multiplexing) equipment doesn't monitor traffic once it is has been converted to light -- it has to convert it back to electrical signals to measure the bits. Constant measurement of traffic is crucial to service providers because it allows them to charge customers according to what they have used.

GǣNobody else can do this. They are measuring bits on a wavelength without having to go out of band,Gǥ says Young
fk
fk
12/4/2012 | 8:23:13 PM
re: Yipes Picks LuxN Gear
I read the paper as well. Indeed, as Tsunami notes, it is not a "real" measurement of BER but rather an approximation. Rather than dismissing this as "pseudo-science" as does Tsunami, however, I think we need to ask the question about this method of estimating BER: is it good enough? As engineers, we routinely make just this sort of assessment all over the place, from the amount of jitter we tolerate on our clock sources to terms in equations that we can ignore. The interesting question is whether LuxN's method of estimating BER is good enough for the purposes for which the carriers need BER measurements. Indeed, the carriers don't require exactitude here. They really only care about order of magnitude. they aren't interested in 6.23876562723 x 10^-11. They only really care about the exponent. It is entirely possible that the means of approximation is sufficient to achieve this relatively loose standard. I'd like to know how they do it (which might assist in determining whether this technology can be "good enough" or if it's simply marketechnology.)

A healthy skepticism is in order, but not out of hand dismissal. Out of hand dismissal was used to rule out the possibility of man flying only 100 years ago, after all.
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