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FTTx

Adtran Preps Its Next FTTH Move

5:55 PM -- Adtran Inc. (Nasdaq: ADTN) apparently has something up its sleeve in fiber-to-the-whatever (FTTW).

It got mentioned in a conference call today with media and analysts. Vice president of marketing Gary Bolton was listing some of the ongoing progress in broadband, such as the use of vectoring and bonding in VDSL, or the continued march of fiber broadband. "We have some new architectures Adtran will be announcing this fall," he then said.

So, watch for that.

The real point of the event was to update the media on how the Recovery Act is going. As we've mentioned, most of the money still hasn't been handed out, and the pool vanishes after Sept. 30, when the US government starts its new fiscal year. (See Recovery Act Funds Sit Still.)

Bolton's estimate is that another $4 billion in awards will come out of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) and Rural Utilities Service (RUS) before that deadline. So far, $5.1 billion has been allocated. (The figures include matching funds from grant/loan recipients, which is why they total more than the $7.2 billion allocated to the Recovery Act.)

Here's how Adtran sees the endgame unfolding:

Table 1: Recovery Act Finale
Agency/Week Expected Number of Projects Expected Dollar Amount Description
RUS,
Week of Aug. 16
50 $190M Last Mile
NTIA,
Week of Aug. 16
70 $1.3B-$1.6B PCC, SBA, CCI, and Public safety
RUS,
Week of Sept. 6
65 $450M Last Mile, Satellite, Technology assistance
NTIA,
Week of Sept. 6
50 $600M-$900M PCC, SBA, CCI, and Public safety
RUS,
Week of Sept. 27
15 $300M-$600M Public safety, mostly
NTIA,
Week of Sept. 27
n/a $100M-$200M Broadband mapping
Source: Adtran


— Craig Matsumoto, West Coast Editor, Light Reading

Pete Baldwin 12/5/2012 | 4:26:13 PM
re: Adtran Preps Its Next FTTH Move

Adtran has done a couple of these conference calls now, mostly summarizing the different policy events going on:  Recovery Act, USF reform, Verizon/Google, etc.  Not sure the analysts were too wowed by it (they only got one question at the end).


The main point seemed to be that Adtran is participating in these different acts, sending people to Washington to keep involved in the discussion. Calix and Occam are probably similarly involved.


What's your response to that? Are you glad (or not) that tech companies are taking their case to DC?

paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 4:26:12 PM
re: Adtran Preps Its Next FTTH Move

 


Having done the DC thing, I doubt Adtran is actually spending time in DC.  I expect what they are doing is having some consultants talk to them and talking to NECA, RUS, and NTIA.  Those government organizations have been doing a number of conferences.  What you have seen from the vendors is a number of these events.  There are consultants that have been doing them as well.


I expect that Adtran is looking to use these things to raise its PR profile and set itself up as a thought leader (by the way I like Gary Bolton).


The problem is that DC and Tech (and even actual business) is like oil and water.  DC does not understand Tech and does not understand an actual business.


seven


 

jayja 12/5/2012 | 4:26:08 PM
re: Adtran Preps Its Next FTTH Move

I spoke with Rep. Daniel Issa at a reception several years ago.  He ran his own business (wireless car key) before being elected to Congress.  He told me that I would be shocked at how little those in Congress understood about business or how money was made.  Value creation, "buy low - sell high", etc.:  beyond most of them.  Explains a lot....

rjmcmahon 12/5/2012 | 4:26:05 PM
re: Adtran Preps Its Next FTTH Move

Congress knows all too well how money is *made* - the private sector banks print it with regulation by the quasi-governmental Federal Reserve.  What they don't seem to know is that the money supply should reflect productivity.  Instead what Congress has done is prostititue themselves to the financial sector using our tax dollars, a financial sector that has gamed the real economy and added no value.   Now what we need are real policies that help increase productivity which means the creation of quality jobs and when large sectors of the population don't have such jobs, it's pretty obvious that they are failing miserably.

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