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Cloud Services

SlideshowGoogle: Carriers & Cloud Providers Need to Cooperate

Geng Lin, Google CTO of corporate networks. That's a pic of a Google data center on the slide behind him. Look close and you'll see your Gmail inbox.
Geng Lin, Google CTO of corporate networks. That's a pic of a Google data center on the slide behind him. Look close and you'll see your Gmail inbox.

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Mitch Wagner 10/20/2014 | 11:43:02 PM
Re: Ah but can you get regulators to join? Good point. This seems to be everything the net neutrality advocates are fighting against. 
DHagar 10/17/2014 | 8:07:38 PM
Re: ah, but can you get regulators to join? danelcawrey, I think that you have nailed it.  It may be musical chairs time - in that the new space is changing the relationships and has unleashed new competition.
danielcawrey 10/17/2014 | 7:01:22 PM
Re: Ah but can you get regulators to join? I think for the time being these cloud companies and service providers have a functional relationship. But this does sound like a warning from the likes of Google that more cooperation is needed.

Maybe cloud and service providers don't have a functional relationship anymore. Rather, it may be more disfunctional than we had previously thought. 
DHagar 10/17/2014 | 1:14:48 PM
Re: ah, but can you get the regulators to join? brooks7, great points.  That is the issue, there have to be effective (for markets) and fair (for public policy) lines drawn now that defines the space for the players in the evolving markets (ie B2C, etc.). 

Someone is going to have to be the "adult".
brooks7 10/17/2014 | 1:03:52 PM
Re: Re, ah, but can you get regulators to join? Just FYI, an information service at an Enterprise level can be created that has all kinds of QOS SLAs.  That is not a problem today.

The challenge is when that same infrastructure wants to be connected to 3rd parties.  If there are a small set of well defined partners it can be solved.  The bigger the number of 3rd parties the worse it is.

Which leads us to the problem is really when cloud folks and carriers have B2C services.

seven

 
Atlantis-dude 10/17/2014 | 12:53:22 PM
enterp or svc providr Which part of goog is this guy representing in his talk?
DHagar 10/17/2014 | 12:18:12 PM
Re, ah, but can you get regulators to join? TomNolle,  Exactly - which results in not resolving any of the issues effectively.  What it truly requires is knowledge of the industry and then an "intelligent" assessment of the impact on both the public/private markets, then to provide clarity and direction as to how to preserve the rights of all parties, through effective public policy.

We won't hold our breath!
TomNolle 10/17/2014 | 9:45:43 AM
Re: ah, but can you get regulators to join? The trouble with shaping regulatory policy is the same as the trouble shaping public policy through regulations and legislation in any arena.  We think you can take to stupidly extreme positions and average them out to create one smart one!
DHagar 10/16/2014 | 6:56:23 PM
Re: ah, but can you get regulators to join? TomNolle, well stated.  That does result in a messy picture; certainly one that does not serve the market.
TomNolle 10/16/2014 | 6:20:52 PM
Re: ah, but can you get regulators to join? To ask operators to do something when we have a set of regulations (the Neutrality Act, passed by the previous FCC) that essentially say "no settlement and no interprovider QoS" and a court decision that says that FCC order is void, is unlrealistic.  It's like asking someone to break the law.  We need legal clarity to support investment, period.  Regulators are involved because we're in a regulated industry, but we need to have regulations conform to our policy goals for the industry.  If that means declaring there ARE no regulations, that's fine, but we can't be ambiguous, which sadly is the situation now.
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