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Engineering VP Hops the Train Out of PlumGridEngineering VP Hops the Train Out of PlumGrid

SDN hopeful PlumGrid is set to announce a new VP engineering after the departure of former Cisco staffer Lele Nardin.

Mitch Wagner

March 6, 2014

2 Min Read
Engineering VP Hops the Train Out of PlumGrid

SUNNYVALE, Calif. -- PlumGrid VP engineering (and amateur racecar driver) Lele Nardin has left the SDN company after less than two years to work on the railroad.

Lilee Systems, which makes communications systems for railroads, recently announced it was hiring Nardin.

Figure 1: Source: veggiefrog Source: veggiefrog

Nardin left PlumGrid Inc. , which has developed virtual network infrastructure software for companies building cloud datacenters, around the New Year, as planned from the time he joined the company in 2012, said PlumGrid president and CEO Awais Nemat. Nardin signed on for a two-year hitch to bring discipline to the engineering process and ship PlumGrid's software-defined networking product, IO Visor, which launched last year. (See Plumgrid Launches SDN Overlay Platform.)

"He was here for two years and did the job of getting the company up and running," Nemat said in an interview at the company's offices.

Nardin continues to advise PlumGrid, Nemat said.

PlumGrid has selected a successor for Nardin and will announce the choice in the second quarter, Nemat said.

SDN is one of a number of key topics that will feature at The Big Telecom Event (BTE), June 17/18 at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers.

Nardin was previously senior VP engineering at Ericsson Silicon Valley. Before that he worked at Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO) for 15 years, starting as a software engineer and serving as VP and general manager since 2000, according to a statement from PlumGrid when it announced Nardin's signing on.

  • Nardin led some of Cisco's most profitable business units, all of which achieved annual revenue exceeding $1 billion. He also had oversight for some of the industry's most deployed routers, including the Cisco 7200, which he brought to the $10 billion revenue milestone, the Cisco 7500 and 7600 product families, the Cisco 10000, and the Cat6k and Cat5k. In addition, he drove the definition and development of the Cisco ASR1000, the modular router platform pioneering IOS over Linux and introducing the Cisco QuantumFlow processor.

The PlumGrid statement adds that "Nardin earned a Master's degree in Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications Systems from the University of Padova, Italy, and is an amateur racecar driver." (See? I wasn't making that part up about the driving.)

I left messages with Lilee Systems and Nardin. If I hear anything interesting from them, I'll let you know in the comments below.

— Mitch Wagner, Circle me on Google+ Follow me on TwitterVisit my LinkedIn profileFollow me on Facebook, West Coast Bureau Chief, Light Reading.
Got a tip about SDN or NFV? Send it to [email protected].

About the Author(s)

Mitch Wagner

Executive Editor, Light Reading

San Diego-based Mitch Wagner is many things. As well as being "our guy" on the West Coast (of the US, not Scotland, or anywhere else with indifferent meteorological conditions), he's a husband (to his wife), dissatisfied Democrat, American (so he could be President some day), nonobservant Jew, and science fiction fan. Not necessarily in that order.

He's also one half of a special duo, along with Minnie, who is the co-habitor of the West Coast Bureau and Light Reading's primary chewer of sticks, though she is not the only one on the team who regularly munches on bark.

Wagner, whose previous positions include Editor-in-Chief at Internet Evolution and Executive Editor at InformationWeek, will be responsible for tracking and reporting on developments in Silicon Valley and other US West Coast hotspots of communications technology innovation.

Beats: Software-defined networking (SDN), network functions virtualization (NFV), IP networking, and colored foods (such as 'green rice').

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