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Cloud Native/NFV

SlideshowOpen Source Is Like a Puppy, Says Platform9 CEO

Appealing, but a lot of work.
Appealing, but a lot of work.

mhhfive 7/5/2017 | 8:31:42 PM
Re: The difference between cloud portability and cloud arbitrage... > "vehicles to make such arbitrage seamless - such as Kubernetes - have only recently become available."

But even Kubernetes isn't immune to the faults of open source's funding and support problems. If Google stops propping it up, it could fracture into a handful of incompatible forks, and become a bit more like OpenStack.

http://www.infoworld.com/article/3204597/open-source-tools/kubernetes-days-may-be-numbered-as-open-source-changes.html 

Data storage and data transfer are, and will be, the limiting factor for the foreseeable future for true portability between clouds. It's not every cloud service that can drive up with a semi-truck filled with SSDs and haul away exabytes of data for you on a whim.... 
mhhfive 7/5/2017 | 8:23:27 PM
Re: Old for a puppy > "My colleague Carol Wilson traces the puppy-open source metaphor back to at least 2015."

Haha! It's a great metaphor -- even if it's just 2 years old -- what's that in dog years, 14? In the tech world.. it's ancient?
Mitch Wagner 7/5/2017 | 4:21:29 PM
Old for a puppy My colleague Carol Wilson traces the puppy-open source metaphor back to at least 2015.

Was new to me when Sirish used it, and I've been covering open source for 20 years. 

Regardless of how old it is, I think it's great, and much better than that expression "free as in speech not as in beer" which is just dumb. 
Mitch Wagner 7/5/2017 | 4:19:57 PM
Re: The difference between cloud portability and cloud arbitrage... It's not more widespread because people are still moving to the cloud and getting their multi-cloud infrastructure organized. Arbitrage is the next step. 
danielcawrey 7/5/2017 | 3:27:40 PM
Re: The difference between cloud portability and cloud arbitrage... I like this idea of cloud arbitrage. Too many vendors are locking in customers, which is pretty unfair when you start to realize all th work it takes to do migrations between clouds. No wonder this is coming from a software provider that recognizes this. 
sirishraghuram 7/5/2017 | 3:19:45 PM
Re: The difference between cloud portability and cloud arbitrage... There are multiple dimensions to cloud arbitrage. In the most minimal implementation, arbitrage could be supported within a single public cloud provider, while using an open-source orchestration system.

It is unclear why this isn't already widespread, possibly because it represents a revenue conflict (innovator's dilemma?) for the largest public cloud providers? Or possibly because vehicles to make such arbitrage seamless - such as Kubernetes - have only recently become available.

Systems like Kubernetes have already solved the compute portability / fungibility problem. However, data-locality and gravity is still an issue and likely the biggest blocker to cross cloud arbitrage.
mhhfive 7/5/2017 | 12:53:05 PM
The difference between cloud portability and cloud arbitrage... It seems like cloud portability will need to become much more robust before cloud arbitrage can really take off. If a cloud service provider wanted to break an arbitrage service, it could do so instantaneously, no? Unless there were some universally agreed upon standards that all clouds would adhere to... but then that might limit the functionality of an arbitrage play? 
mhhfive 7/5/2017 | 12:49:17 PM
But.. arbitrage opportunities are usually very brief? I'm not so keen on these ephemeral terms.. "cloud arbitrage" sounds extremely volatile and transient to me! Chasing weather patterns seems like a bad analogy for a reliable open source service, but maybe that's just me.
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