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Top 5 Passive Aggressive Uses of Office Communication

Passive aggression is not solely reserved for interpersonal relationships – it's abundant in work situations as well, albeit a little less obvious.

Jessica DiGiacinto

November 21, 2013

5 Slides

Passive aggressive behavior is, I think, one of the most annoying human traits. It's not like you see monkeys or elephants skulking around, rolling their eyes or throwing backhanded compliments at each other. No, that type of thing is reserved for us evolved animals, giving us the ability to fight without really fighting, or slowly wear someone down through teeny, tiny barbs.

And it's not solely reserved for interpersonal relationships. Passive aggression is abundant in work situations as well, albeit a little less obvious. You just need to know how to spot it.

Light Reading is here to help. Click on the image below to see the Top 5 Most Passive Aggressive Uses of Office Communication, and then let us know about other examples that have slimed their way into your cubicle recently.

Figure 1: Make Them Stay on Hold Forever Asking a colleague to join you at 2:00 p.m exactly for a vague ReadyTalk conference, then forcing them to listen to the 
'calming hold music' -- that, incidentally, only increases their anxiety -- while you go grab at cup of coffee at 2:01 p.m. Asking a colleague to join you at 2:00 p.m exactly for a vague ReadyTalk conference, then forcing them to listen to the "calming hold music" -- that, incidentally, only increases their anxiety -- while you go grab at cup of coffee at 2:01 p.m.

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