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PEG Brings 100G Backhaul to Rural Markets

Jason Meyers
8/14/2014
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PEG Bandwidth has expanded its optical backhaul system to accommodate not only the ever-growing capacity needs of mobile networks, but also the rise in gigabit fiber-to-the-home networks in rural markets.

The company, which operates a network spanning 15,000 fiber route miles across the US, recently completed a 100Gbit/s Ethernet route between Dallas and Jackson, Miss. The aim of the 400-mile addition to the network is to bring higher-speed capabilities to more rural regions.

"We have a unique emphasis on rural markets," says Mike Friloux, COO of PEG Bandwidth LLC , noting that the company's business model is based on serving mobile network needs, but naturally extends to addressing the demands of rural telcos, cable operators, municipalities and utilities building high-speed networks. "We justify our business on cellular backhaul, but then we build capabilities that go far beyond that initial deployment. We try and put in a system that allows us to offer the maximum flexibility."

Providing backhaul capacity to that wide range of broadband providers is becoming increasingly important as both mobile and landline networks proliferate in rural regions -- even amid much competitive controversy. (See Gigabit Is the New Black, If Not Muni Networks, Then What? and Muni Utilities Take Gigabit Fight to FCC.)


Get the latest updates on the Gigabit Cities trend by visiting Light Reading's broadband/FTTx content channel.


"Most of the rural markets are looking for transport capacity back to the primary Internet peering points -- it's all about capacity in the rural space," Friloux says. "Whether it's state- or city-sponsored, government grants, Google Fiber, or what have you, we're seeing a lot more aggressive posturing in these Tier 2 and Tier 3 markets. To make that local service work, you need big pipes to serve it."

PEG's big pipes are enabled by a DWDM system provided by Ekinops SA . The platform gives PEG the flexibility to offer 1Gbit/s, 10Gbit/s or 100Gbit/s connections, according to Friloux.

"We don't look at it as a service offering in and of itself -- we look at it as future-proofing the network," he says.

— Jason Meyers, Senior Editor, Utility Communications/IoT, Light Reading

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DOShea
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DOShea,
User Rank: Blogger
8/15/2014 | 10:31:54 AM
100G market
The 100G market seems to be shifting into its next phase. A lot of the long-haul route between major cities are being addressed, the focus is turning to Tier 2 and 3 outposts.
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