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Device operating systems

Elop's Out as Microsoft Refocuses Its Strategy

Stephen Elop is out at Microsoft, the company announced Wednesday, as part of several changes to its senior leadership team and operational groups to "drive engineering alignment against the company's core ambitions."

Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) said in a statement that the changes are designed to help it "reinvent productivity and business processes, build the intelligent cloud platform and create more personal computing." The changes, which leave Microsoft with 12 senior leaders, include:

  • Elop, Kirill Tatarinov and Eric Rudder will all leave Microsoft after a designated transition period. Unrelated to the restructuring, Chief Insights Officer Mark Penn is also leaving the company in September.
  • Executive Vice President Terry Myerson will lead a newly formed teamed, Windows and Devices Group (WDG), which will be a combination of the Operating Systems Group and the Microsoft Devices Group (MGD) that Elop led, focused on building Windows-powered personal computing experiences.
  • Executive Vice President Scott Guthrie will continue to lead the Cloud and Enterprise team, which will now also encompass the Dynamics development team.
  • Executive Vice President Qi Lu will continue to lead the Applications and Services Group (ASG) focused on productivity services.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella wrote in an email to employees: "When Stephen Elop returned to Microsoft, he oriented MDG to create the best Microsoft experience through its devices, inclusive of hardware, software and services. He has been a strong advocate of the need to drive focus and accountability around the delivery of these experiences and has helped drive tighter alignment toward the ambition of more personal computing. With the structural change described above, Stephen and I have agreed that now is the right time for him to retire from Microsoft. I regret the loss of leadership that this represents, and look forward to seeing where his next destination will be."


For more on happenings in the mobile market, visit the dedicated mobile content page here on Light Reading


Elop earned the dubious distinction of entering Light Reading's 2014 Hall of Fame as the token "villain" for what many believed to be his "Trojan horse" strategy at Microsoft. He joined Nokia as the CEO in 2010 after two years at Microsoft but when Nokia struggled, under his leadership, to regain its footing in the mobile market, Elop struck up a partnership with his former employer, Microsoft, in 2011. (See Light Reading Hall of Fame 2014.)

And you know how that story ends -- Microsoft bought Nokia's device business in 2013, and Elop secured himself the role of executive vice president of Microsoft's Devices Group, along with a fat paycheck. (See Microsoft Officially Closes Nokia Buy and Microsoft's Elop Denies He Was a Trojan Horse .)

Now, the question many are asking is whether Elop wasn't actually the Trojan horse he was believed to be. Or, perhaps, whether his work is just simply done. (See The Nokia/Microsoft Conspiracy Theory.)

Microsoft's work, on the other hand, is far from done. Under Nadella, the company is working to make Windows 10 the de facto operating system for PCs and mobile devices alike, but it has been struggling in a mobile market dominated by Android and iOS. This executive shake-up announcement comes about a month before Microsoft is due to release Windows 10 to the general public. (See Expect Further Cuts at Microsoft Devices – Analyst and Microsoft to Axe 12,500 Ex-Nokia Employees.)

— Sarah Thomas, Circle me on Google+ Follow me on TwitterVisit my LinkedIn profile, Editorial Operations Director, Light Reading

PaulERainford 6/17/2015 | 11:50:20 AM
Say what? So Microsoft is firing people to "drive engineering alignment against the company's core ambitions". Does this represent a new low in corporate bullsh*tspeak? Answers on a PowerPoint slide please.
Sarah Thomas 6/17/2015 | 11:56:41 AM
Re: Say what? Ha, it is a fancy way to justify the executives leaving (they weren't fired, they agreed it's time to retire...).

It makes sense to more closely integrate the different units since they lines are blurring between devices and services and Windows 10 is supposed to cover them all, but I still see this more as a sign that Microsoft's strategy hasn't been working. I don't know if they can turn it around in such a saturated market.
mendyk 6/17/2015 | 12:36:46 PM
Re: Say what? I couldn't get past the "Chief Insights Officer." Must be one hell of a gig.
PaulERainford 6/17/2015 | 12:45:20 PM
Re: Say what? Yes, reminded me of the (admittedly spoof) job ad that appeared on the BBC website for a 'Head of Better'.
Sarah Thomas 6/17/2015 | 1:06:08 PM
Re: Say what? Psh didn't even phase me. I've heard much worse/better titles in the past. In fact, I heard a "Futureologist" speak last week. 
mendyk 6/17/2015 | 2:38:44 PM
Re: Say what? What makes this classic BS is that it has an inscrutible logic. If you drive something AGAINST something else, that means a direct conflict. As in, I will drive my car against traffic on the Cross-Bronx Expressway. Chances are, there will be a serious wreckoning well before I get to Jerome Avenue.
Mitch Wagner 6/17/2015 | 3:11:53 PM
No surprise Hardly surprising to see a passed-over CEO candidate leave a company. The only surprise is that he stayed as long as he did post-Nadella.
R Clark 6/17/2015 | 9:37:45 PM
Re: No surprise Yes, you wonder why Elop went now and not when Nadella took over.

If I recall, Ballmer was also a practitioner of muscular corporate drivel . This is the company that came up with 'you have performed an illegal operation' so maybe no surprise.
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