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Optical/IP

Cuban: Block P2P

3:30 PM -- In his latest blog entry, Mark Cuban urges "Comcast and Every Cable/Telco" to block peer-to-peer (P2P) traffic:

As a consumer, I want my internet experience to be as fast as possible. The last thing I want slowing my internet service down are P2P freeloaders. Thats right, P2P content distributors are nothing more than freeloaders. The only person/organization that benefits from P2P usage are those that are trying to distribute content and want to distribute it on someone else's bandwidth dime.


Of course, the question becomes who the freeloaders are and who is benefiting from the distribution of content. Cuban could be talking about P2P in its most basic form -- whereby end users use applications such as BitTorrent, eDonkey, and the like to illegally download copyrighted content -- or the use of P2P to distribute legal, premium content to end users.

It could be that it doesn't matter much to Mr. Cuban: There's the distinct possibility that he sees Joost users (or, more appropriately, Joost content providers) as freeloaders slowing down his network connection.

I guess my only question is whether, as a content provider and business owner, Cuban would use a P2P service if he could provide a better quality of experience at a lower cost over the Internet, or if he would stick to his guns and pay more to distribute his content in a way that would protect another end user's connection.

It's a total hypothetical, to be sure, but it reflects a very real question that many content distributors are thinking about.

— Ryan Lawler, Reporter, Light Reading

paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 2:58:16 PM
re: Cuban: Block P2P
I have argued with Contentinople about gaming. But let me just throw another wrench in here....

Blizzard uses BitTorrent P2P to distribute World of Warcraft updates. I think you may see more of this over time.

seven
Pete Baldwin 12/5/2012 | 2:58:16 PM
re: Cuban: Block P2P It could be that it doesn't matter much to Mr. Cuban: There's the distinct possibility that he sees Joost users (or, more appropriately, Joost content providers) as freeloaders slowing down his network connection.

I think that's definitely how he sees it.

And I think I agree with him. If I'm on a shared connection, and the guy next door is using so much bandwidth that it's affecting me ... then yes, I do consider him a problem. Make him pay more, at least. (Which opens up a whole can of worms -- yes, I know they promised you "all you can eat," but that's not going to make me sympathetic, sorry.)

Bottom line, I don't care if his P2P use is illegal or not. As a consumer, it's the available bandwidth I'd worry about.
mikey613 12/5/2012 | 2:58:11 PM
re: Cuban: Block P2P "...and want to distribute it on someone else's bandwidth dime."

I'm no expert, but as far as I understood it, it's on their own bandwidth dime. Perhaps the content is stolen, but the bandwidth they're using is completely legit and paid-for (unless they've also hacked into the SP's network).


"If I'm on a shared connection, and the guy next door is using so much bandwidth that it's affecting me ... then yes, I do consider him a problem."

I'm not sure I see it that way... I certainly do consider there to be a problem, but it's not him. As you mentioned, "they promised you all you can eat." If your service suffers, the problem is not your neighbor who is pushing his subscription terms to the limit, but rather the Service Provider who makes promises they don't intend to keep.
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