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Cloud Native/NFV

SlideshowHow United Airlines Uses Data to Take Pain out of Flight Delays

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Michelle 10/30/2017 | 2:00:39 PM
Re: Data in action I hope they figure it all out someday. We might have flying cars by then and use commercial airlines a lot less often...
[email protected] 10/30/2017 | 12:44:57 PM
Data in action I fly United often because of where I live but I have to say I have not experienced much more than a text informing me of a flight delay or that its time to check in. I would love to see more proactive texts and more customer loyalty for its longtime consumers but right now that is not the case. Airline loyalty programs are becoming very difficulties to use with their complex way of awarding miles. The industry has consolidated so much that flyers pay the price, on a regular flight or delayed flight
mhhfive 10/30/2017 | 11:50:30 AM
Re: More Helpful Data > "...flying any place one can drive in six hours or less hardly worth the hassles and delays. Flying was a much better experience decades ago."

Just wait..? In a few years, SpaceX might be able to get you almost anywhere in the world in under an hour! If you can handle the G-forces, that is... and whatever kind of TSA they'll have to board a rocketship. :P
Susan Fourtané 10/28/2017 | 10:49:33 AM
Re: More Helpful Data I completely agree. Even in Europe, sometimes it’s just much better to take the Eurostar from London to Paris and have a pleasant 2 hour trip rather than going through the airport nightmare. Plus, if you think about it, it takes longer to fly to Paris with all the time you have to spend at the airport and going there. Or to some of the nearby cities in Continental Europe. Not just flying, the airport as well. And it just gets worse. I keep on waiting for teleporting during my lifetime. :)
Phil_Britt 10/28/2017 | 10:34:19 AM
Re: More Helpful Data We had no such thing as body scanners back in the day (severely dating myself), and they and other security procedures today are extremely invasive. And flying any place one can drive in six hours or less hardly worth the hassles and delays. Flying was a much better experience decades ago. Now it's nothing but a tremendous hassle, but there's no other reasonable option for overseas or for very long distances even in-country. 
Susan Fourtané 10/28/2017 | 10:21:27 AM
Re: More Helpful Data Sometime in the early 2000s, I was flying from Washington DC to Frankfurt. It was a United flight operated by Lufthansa. They kept me at security forever. I don’t remember details, but I do remember that thanks to them I missed my flight. Of course I complained. They sent me in the next flight with an upgrade to Business class. — Yep. I meant the body scanner earlier, not the X-Ray machine. I found the officer’s manual scanning particularly over invasive.
Phil_Britt 10/28/2017 | 9:57:51 AM
Re: More Helpful Data X-rays better than the alternative. In Chicago, American was the first to have inspected bags -- before the advent of airport x-ray machines, and a contract that started in late fall of 1972, so that holiday season, we wound up having to open up many wrapped gifts to inspect them. The security started because of the recent rise of hijackings.
Susan Fourtané 10/28/2017 | 9:54:31 AM
Re: More Helpful Data Sure, security at the airports was quite different from what it is today: sometimes quite invasive, as I experienced this week in Berlin. Perhaps someone should develop a more sophisticated X-Ray machine so to avoid any physical contact with the ”officers.” Perhaps journalism was the same in those days. :)
Phil_Britt 10/28/2017 | 9:19:14 AM
Re: More Helpful Data It was basic security (no guns), we ran xray machines at airport when they first came out. The same company provided ushers at the ballpark. It was basically a high-school/early college job. Would never have paid the bills -- kind of like journalism today :)
Susan Fourtané 10/28/2017 | 9:16:11 AM
Re: More Helpful Data Too many combinations is never a good idea, I believe. Why did you leave security?
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