& cplSiteName &

Verizon Connects Cloud With On-Demand WAN

Carol Wilson
4/9/2014
50%
50%

Verizon today rolled out a Secure Cloud Interconnect service, making its private IP services available on-demand to connect to multiple clouds, including its own Verizon Terremark cloud and Microsoft Azure, with the promise of more to come. The company is also providing direct access to Verizon Private IP service in 15 Equinix data centers in the US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific. (See Verizon Offers Secure Cloud Interconnect.)

Verizon Enterprise Solutions is promoting the new service as its answer to enterprise needs to support hybrid clouds in a secure and reliable way that isn't dependent on the public Internet, as well as an on-demand, pay-as-you-go service that makes the network as fluid as the compute and storage resource it supports.

On the multi-cloud connection via private IP links, Verizon's announcement isn't all that impressive, notes Brian Washburn, service director with Current Analysis . Multiple other providers including AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T), tw telecom inc. (Nasdaq: TWTC), and Level 3 Communications Inc. (NYSE: LVLT) provide services similar to the Verizon SCI offer. Even Verizon has been offering private IP connections through and between many data centers, particularly between Verizon Terremark and Equinix Inc. (Nasdaq: EQIX) data centers.

What Washburn is intrigued by, in this latest announcement, is the on-demand nature of the service with "burstability" and pay-for-what-you-use billing, and Verizon's end-to-end connections, encompassing the cloud, data center, and enterprise.

"Other folks have solved the unlimited bursting into the data center, but they don't have the bandwidth-on-demand that Verizon is including," Washburn says. "tw telecom has the on-demand bandwidth and the secure connection to third-party data centers, but Verizon has the potential for end-to-end service that others don't have yet. That can be a competitive advantage for them."

By replacing static ports on a router with burstable bandwidth, Verizon makes it possible for enterprises to consume much greater bandwidth over short stretches of time to accommodate specific applications or data needs in connecting to the cloud or data center, and pay only for what they use. For example, moving workloads into the cloud can create a one-time need for much greater bandwidth than the enterprise needs going forward.

Verizon sees this latest offer removing key barriers to entry for enterprises, who from the outset have wanted easily managed, secure connections to the cloud that can vary with the compute/storage load and the ability to link to multiple clouds to avoid lock-in, says Thierry Sender, director of product development. And while Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) Azure is the first cloud other than Verizon Terremark to be connected via SCI, others are soon to be added.

What enterprises want is a pre-integrated solution but also flexibility in the multi-cloud space, so they don't get locked in, and ease of management when it comes to linking cloud with on-premises databases and apps, as well as supporting applications between the collocation and the private cloud space, he adds.

"We have allowed enterprises to connect to the public cloud with a multi-cloud solution accessible from their private network and eliminated the barrier to cloud adoption that we hear from a lot of our customers," Sender says.

The hybrid environment Verizon is supporting includes linking physical databases or apps on the customer premises with apps or databases in the cloud, as well as multiple-cloud links, so that enterprises don't have to make a giant leap into the cloud but can rationally tie together their resources.

What Verizon did to support this service was to extend its private IP edges into the data centers and at those locations establish connections to cloud service providers and also support connectivity for collocation to non-cloud connections, Sender says. So enterprises can add cloud service to their VPNs, and the cloud service provider serving that location shows up on their VPN like other locations, giving them the management, security and performance benefits of their private IP networks but with on-demand billing.

For more information on Verizon's cloud initiatives:

— Carol Wilson, Editor-at-Large, Light Reading

(6)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
4/10/2014 | 4:34:12 PM
Re: Does this get them to where they need to be?
I don't see me-too as a problem with this kind of complex enterprise service. It's the execution that matters. The prime mover or first-to-market advantage is small. 
Carol Wilson
50%
50%
Carol Wilson,
User Rank: Blogger
4/9/2014 | 9:47:27 PM
Re: Does this get them to where they need to be?
Actually, the me-too part - according to Brian Washburn - was more the private IP connections. The tying together of multiple clouds on the WAN is something I think Verizon is taking some of the lead on.
DOShea
50%
50%
DOShea,
User Rank: Blogger
4/9/2014 | 9:40:18 PM
Re: Does this get them to where they need to be?
The hybrid cloud support is important, too, even though it is a me-too addition by Verizon in this case. It is further evidence that customers aren't sticking with just one type of cloud, which I think entperise-focused vendors like Cisco were saying that even before the recent round of carrier activity.
Carol Wilson
50%
50%
Carol Wilson,
User Rank: Blogger
4/9/2014 | 8:52:31 PM
Re: Does this get them to where they need to be?
I think Verizon -- and others - have learned a lot from their first couple of years inthe trenches when selling "the cloud" didn't turn out to be as easy as they thought it would be.
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
4/9/2014 | 7:04:25 PM
Re: Does this get them to where they need to be?
I did a one-on-one interview with Verizon's John Considine, and plan an article based on that over the next couple of days. This offering certainly fits what what he told me of Verizon's strategy of allowing customers to move to the cloud at their own paces, leaving applications hosted on premises as needed. 
Carol Wilson
50%
50%
Carol Wilson,
User Rank: Blogger
4/9/2014 | 11:20:10 AM
Does this get them to where they need to be?
There has been a lot of talk about making the network on-demand in the same way that cloud computing has been and giving enterprises all the tools they need to move to the cloud the things they deem appropriate, while maintaining integration with what's already running just fine on their premises.

Does this accomplish that goal? 
Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading is spending much of this year digging into the details of how automation technology will impact the comms market, but let's take a moment to also look at how automation is set to overturn the current world order by the middle of the century.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
November 1, 2017, The Royal Garden Hotel
November 1, 2017, The Montcalm Marble Arch
November 2, 2017, 8 Northumberland Avenue, London, UK
November 2, 2017, 8 Northumberland Avenue London
November 10, 2017, The Westin Times Square, New York, NY
November 16, 2017, ExCel Centre, London
November 30, 2017, The Westin Times Square
May 14-17, 2018, Austin Convention Center
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
With the mobile ecosystem becoming increasingly vulnerable to security threats, AdaptiveMobile has laid out some of the key considerations for the wireless community.
Hot Topics
Muni Policies Stymie Edge Computing
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/17/2017
'Brutal' Automation & the Looming Workforce Cull
Iain Morris, News Editor, 10/18/2017
Is US Lurching Back to Monopoly Status?
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/16/2017
Pai's FCC Raises Alarms at Competitive Carriers
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/16/2017
Worried About Bandwidth for 4K? Here Comes 8K!
Aditya Kishore, Practice Leader, Video Transformation, Telco Transformation, 10/17/2017
Animals with Phones
Selfie Game Strong Click Here
Latest Comment
Live Digital Audio

Understanding the full experience of women in technology requires starting at the collegiate level (or sooner) and studying the technologies women are involved with, company cultures they're part of and personal experiences of individuals.

During this WiC radio show, we will talk with Nicole Engelbert, the director of Research & Analysis for Ovum Technology and a 23-year telecom industry veteran, about her experiences and perspectives on women in tech. Engelbert covers infrastructure, applications and industries for Ovum, but she is also involved in the research firm's higher education team and has helped colleges and universities globally leverage technology as a strategy for improving recruitment, retention and graduation performance.

She will share her unique insight into the collegiate level, where women pursuing engineering and STEM-related degrees is dwindling. Engelbert will also reveal new, original Ovum research on the topics of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, security and augmented reality, as well as discuss what each of those technologies might mean for women in our field. As always, we'll also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air and chat board.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed
Partner Perspectives - content from our sponsors
The Mobile Broadband Road Ahead
By Kevin Taylor, for Huawei
All Partner Perspectives