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Privacy Ages Well

4/6/2012
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9:45 AM We keep hearing about privacy slipping away – but how privacy-minded were you 10 or 20 years ago?
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paolo.franzoi
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paolo.franzoi,
User Rank: Light Sabre
12/5/2012 | 5:37:03 PM
re: Privacy Ages Well


 


Dear Mr. Harvey,


We are watching your activities with increasing alarm.  We need to discuss this behavior at our first opportunity.  Please wait for us with your arms raised over your head and your hands empty.  Thank you for your cooperation.


National Security Agency

DCITDave
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DCITDave,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:37:03 PM
re: Privacy Ages Well


Great point, Craig.


People in their 20s just aren't as worried about privacy because they don't have as much to lose. That does change with age. We all go from hating "The Man" to becoming him, especially when you wake up one day and realize that other people's salaries rely heavily on how you do your job.


I also think there's something to the theory of hiding in plain sight. One reason I'm not as worried about posting things online now is that, seriously, who besides the five or six people I know personally is really paying attention? Sure, a lot of things I post are "public" but only a lunatic or an HR administrator would ever take the time to look it all up.


 


 


 


 

DCITDave
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DCITDave,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:37:02 PM
re: Privacy Ages Well


Dear NSA,


Here's another picture of my cat:


http://www.fotophil.me/Photography/Blog-Pics/i-J27cStD/0/M/20120405-HAR9663-M.jpg


You're welcome.


ph

paolo.franzoi
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paolo.franzoi,
User Rank: Light Sabre
12/5/2012 | 5:37:02 PM
re: Privacy Ages Well


Phil,


I note your terrorist cell markers in about the 30th row of the picture...but to the actual topic.


Craig,


I think there is some truth to what you say.  Sort of like the statement (I think it was Churchill) that if you were not a liberal at 20 you have no heart and a conservative at 40 you have no brain.  I also think that the Internet is different than past mechanisms.  Before it was basically impossible to mechanize theft.  Now it is (see Nigerian Scams for a simple example).  That means theft scales beyond a person and his/her ability to steal.


seven

Pete Baldwin
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Pete Baldwin,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:37:01 PM
re: Privacy Ages Well


Thanks, seven. Yes, the Internet does have clear differences -- in its ability for mass scale, and its permanency. For a lot of people, I think the permanency part still hasn't fully sunk in.

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