& cplSiteName &

NTT Taps SDN to Enhance Cloud Flexibility

Mitch Wagner
3/10/2014
50%
50%

SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Open Networking Summit (ONS) 2014 -- In a market where service providers are in the very early stages of implementing SDN, NTT stands out, since it's already using an SDN overlay to connect 12 cloud data centers on three continents.

And it's still warming up, with just 5% to 10% of its network running SDN. (See Defining SDN & NFV.)

Yukio Ito, senior vice president for service infrastructure at NTT Group (NYSE: NTT), described during an ONS plenary how NTT is implementing an overlay network to reduce management overhead and opex. The SDN overlay connects the data centers used in NTT's two-year-old enterprise cloud service, which NTT calls… (wait for it)… "Enterprise Cloud." (See NTT Com, Toshiba Forge Global Cloud Alliance.)

NTT has faced operating difficulties typical for cloud providers. Its customers could quickly spin up new virtual machines and clusters, but making changes to the network was laborious, requiring manual configuration. Like other cloud providers, NTT turned to SDN for a solution. "In our enterprise cloud, we got rid of cost structures and human error due to that process," Ito said. (See AT&T Reveals Audacious SDN Plans.)

NTT's Ito: Cutting costs and improving efficiencies in the WAN with SDN.
NTT's Ito: Cutting costs and improving efficiencies in the WAN with SDN.

The OpenFlow protocol has also proved useful in helping customers configure VPNs, noted the NTT executive. "It might just be a small part of the whole network, but this is a step in making our network more efficient," he said.

In addition to opex savings, NTT's SDN deployment allows NTT to use multiple vendors for networking, avoid redundant deployment, simplify system cooperation, and shorten time-to-market, Ito said.

For the future, NTT is looking to deploy network functions virtualization (NFV) for greater efficiency. The service provider is also looking to expand SDN to its entire network. (See NTT Aims Innovation Efforts at US Enterprises.)

The SDN overlay network connecting 12 data centers is part of NTT's larger MPLS-based network of 156 data centers in 190 countries, NTT spokesman Christopher Davis told me after Ito's presentation. SDN is also being used internally, inside cloud data centers.

SDN provides NTT and its customers with automated tools. For example, SDN lets customers throttle bandwidth themselves. A customer running a backup can crank up its bandwidth, and then throttle it back down when the backup is complete and the higher bandwidth is no longer needed, Davis explained. (See NTT Advances SDN.)

SDN also allows customers to retain their existing IP addresses when migrating from their own data centers to NTT's clouds, he added.

— Mitch Wagner, West Coast Bureau Chief, Light Reading Circle me on Google+ Follow me on TwitterVisit my LinkedIn profileFollow me on Facebook Got a tip about SDN or NFV? Send it to mwagner@lightreading.com.

(2)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
3/10/2014 | 8:52:44 PM
Re: NTT definitely a pioneer on this front
I've been hearing that one big obstacle to SDN deployment is a shortage of big customer deployments. It's the classic Catch-22 of emerging technology. NTT is a great exception to this rule.
Carol Wilson
50%
50%
Carol Wilson,
User Rank: Blogger
3/10/2014 | 10:50:43 AM
NTT definitely a pioneer on this front
Doug Junkins of NTT America is going to be discussing this at our Big Telecom Event. NTT has done a lot of internal development to make SDN work and it will be interesting to hear about that and whether others face a similar challenge. 
Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading is spending much of this year digging into the details of how automation technology will impact the comms market, but let's take a moment to also look at how automation is set to overturn the current world order by the middle of the century.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
November 1, 2017, The Royal Garden Hotel
November 1, 2017, The Montcalm Marble Arch
November 2, 2017, 8 Northumberland Avenue, London, UK
November 2, 2017, 8 Northumberland Avenue London
November 10, 2017, The Westin Times Square, New York, NY
November 16, 2017, ExCel Centre, London
November 30, 2017, The Westin Times Square
May 14-17, 2018, Austin Convention Center
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
With the mobile ecosystem becoming increasingly vulnerable to security threats, AdaptiveMobile has laid out some of the key considerations for the wireless community.
Hot Topics
Muni Policies Stymie Edge Computing
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/17/2017
Pai's FCC Raises Alarms at Competitive Carriers
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/16/2017
Is US Lurching Back to Monopoly Status?
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/16/2017
'Brutal' Automation & the Looming Workforce Cull
Iain Morris, News Editor, 10/18/2017
Worried About Bandwidth for 4K? Here Comes 8K!
Aditya Kishore, Practice Leader, Video Transformation, Telco Transformation, 10/17/2017
Animals with Phones
Live Digital Audio

Understanding the full experience of women in technology requires starting at the collegiate level (or sooner) and studying the technologies women are involved with, company cultures they're part of and personal experiences of individuals.

During this WiC radio show, we will talk with Nicole Engelbert, the director of Research & Analysis for Ovum Technology and a 23-year telecom industry veteran, about her experiences and perspectives on women in tech. Engelbert covers infrastructure, applications and industries for Ovum, but she is also involved in the research firm's higher education team and has helped colleges and universities globally leverage technology as a strategy for improving recruitment, retention and graduation performance.

She will share her unique insight into the collegiate level, where women pursuing engineering and STEM-related degrees is dwindling. Engelbert will also reveal new, original Ovum research on the topics of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, security and augmented reality, as well as discuss what each of those technologies might mean for women in our field. As always, we'll also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air and chat board.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed