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Microsoft plans to add more services to Nokia phones right away, and is targeting growth in feature phones in emerging markets.

Microsoft Officially Closes Nokia Buy

Sarah Reedy
4/25/2014
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Nokia's devices division is now officially part of Microsoft, wrapping up a deal first announced last September and giving Microsoft its own device business for its Windows Phone operating system.

Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) confirmed it has completed its more than $7 billion acquisition of the Finnish smartphone maker on Friday, enabling it to "accelerate its share of smartphones and feature phones in developed and emerging markets, and increase its role as a devices and services company." (See Nokia Sale to Microsoft Expected to Close This Week, Euronews: Nokia Handsets Sale Delayed and Nokia: It's Really Happening.)

Nokia said in a release that the total transaction price is expected to be slightly higher than the previously announced €5.44 billion ($7.52 billion) after final adjustments have been made.

The two companies first became partners early in 2011. Even though Microsoft has licensing deals in place with others such as Samsung Corp. and High Tech Computer Corp. (HTC) (Taiwan: 2498) -- deals it hopes to continue -- Nokia already accounts for 90% of the Windows Phone devices on the market.

In addition to its phone business, the software giant is acquiring Nokia's design team, most of its manufacturing and assembly facilities and operations (minus manufacturing plants in India and South Korea now excluded from the deal), and sales and marketing support. It will also license its patents.

According to Tom Gibbons, the Microsoft corporate vice president who is responsible for the Nokia integration, the combined company already has a joint operating plan established and Nokia feature phones will start to have more Microsoft services on them right away. It is targeting growth in emerging markets where Android dominates.

Microsoft didn't delve into other specific plans for Nokia, but a leaked letter suggests it will be leaving behind the once iconic Nokia name in favor of "Microsoft Mobile."

Nokia is also expected to announce Rajeev Suri as CEO of what's left of the company, including the NSN infrastructure unit, location services business, and its patents, when it shares its first-quarter earnings on Tuesday.

— Sarah Reedy, Senior Editor, Light Reading

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SarahReedy
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SarahReedy,
User Rank: Blogger
4/25/2014 | 11:34:06 AM
What's in a name?
Do you think it's smart to get rid of the Nokia name? I wonder if it still carries cache in some geographies, or at least more than Microsoft Mobile. I think it needs to be a market-by-market decision. 
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 11:49:24 AM
Re: What's in a name?
As a tech nerd who grew up in the 90s Nokia will always be associated with phones that just wont break. Though I think those even just slightly younger than me might not have the same memories. 

I once had a Nokia phone in my jacked pocket while riding my bike. A car hit me head on and the phone broke in half inside my pocket. When the rescue took me to the hospital they cut off all my cloths, including my jacket and gave them back to me at discarge from the ER along with a pair of scrubs to ride home. I put the two parts of the phone back together over the battery and was able to make a call to my friend. I taped it together and used it like that for the next 2 weeks until I got a new one. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 12:04:01 PM
Re: What's in a name?
Glad you're okay after your accident!

One Nokia I owned just broke out of the blue...to the point that when I called people, it was making horrendous, creepy, whispering/staticy sounds.  (I still have a sound file of it saved somewhere on an old computer.)

Before I realized the problem, I wound up permanently creeping out an old friend of mine when I called her, she hung up on me, and I called her again -- ignorant to why she sounded so freaked out.

She seemed understanding once I was able to talk to her again in person when I explained the problem, but we didn't really talk much after that.
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 12:10:01 PM
Re: What's in a name?
Thanks Joe, 

And no doubt Nokia was never on the cutting edge of any mobile technology. At best they were several years behind everyone else. (Except maybe Nextel)

If you come across that old sound file share it on here I would get a kick out of it. :-)
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 2:25:01 PM
Re: What's in a name?
@thebulk I'm not sure that's true. I would think that in the early years they were cutting edge, but they lost that edge.
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 2:29:02 PM
Re: What's in a name?
@Ariella, Maybe you are right, I just dont remember it that way. I had maybe 3 Nokia phones over the years. My favorite being the Nokia 6800 which had a pretty cool flip keyboard for SMS, when people still used that. But I can always recall there being other companies with phones that had much nicer and more advanced features. 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 2:48:13 PM
Re: What's in a name?
@thebulk according to this http://gadgets.ndtv.com/mobiles/news/how-nokia-went-from-a-position-of-domination-to-abandoning-its-handset-business-444466, Nokia was the dominant player back in 2007. But the article doesn't really go into detail about how it measured up to the cutting edge. 
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 3:04:41 PM
Re: What's in a name?
@Ariella, 

Thanks for the link, what a great read! I had not realized they were so dominate that late in the game, I would have guessed they started to fall around 2005, maybe even earlier. 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 3:28:32 PM
Re: What's in a name?
@thebulk you're most welcome. It's possible some date the decline earlier, saying that they still had the market share but were doomed by that year. I would have to look into it more to ascertain that, as I'm not an expert on Nokia. 
briandnewby
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briandnewby,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 4:02:14 PM
Re: What's in a name?
It is worth wondering what you buy with a handset provider.  No handset provider has maintained long-term competitive advantage, even Apple.  If you could buy Apple's device business today, would you?  I would, if I was me, but I wouldn't if I had a brand name that would get the carriers to return a call to me (like Microsoft).
SarahReedy
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SarahReedy,
User Rank: Blogger
4/25/2014 | 4:37:39 PM
Re: What's in a name?
I'm not sure I follow. Why would a brand like Microsoft not be interested; because you think its strong enough on its own?
briandnewby
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briandnewby,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/27/2014 | 10:03:02 AM
Re: What's in a name?
I guess where I was going was that I think buying a handset provider, or having a Microsoft phone, seems to be an approach with little upside.  Apple had a distribution channel much better than Microsoft has and Apple created its own phone after having great success with its iPods.

Without that natural evolution, I don't think the iPhone would have been successful.  If Apple tried to build a phone or create by buying a handset provider, its chance of success wouldn't have been any greater.  Apple had essentially warmed up the market for a phone that looked like its iPod.

If Apple had wanted to get into the handset business and leverage its brand, without ever having the iPod, I can't see a scenario where it would have been beneficial to buy a handset provider.  Apple's brand would have resulted in enough access with handset providers and carriers and while the upside would be much lower, there would be less risk.

I just think you have to assess all of the pieces and if you have a strong brand, that gives you an opportunity to enter markets with reduced risk.  In Microsoft's case, it could be that the handset company is really more attuned to its gaming business.  An Xbox phone, maybe, or something that allows for the Xbox experience, tablet style.  That wasn't much of a stated reason at the time, but I guess it could have been a stealth reason, or there might be some revisionist history that will link these two assets.

Otherwise, if this was about building a beachhead for Microsoft phones, I think it was a waste of money.  There's likely some intellectual property component that I don't understand; heck, I'm sure there's much here I don't understand.  But with the half-life of the hot handset so short, on the, um, surface, it didn't seem like a good investment.

 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/28/2014 | 6:14:02 PM
Re: What's in a name?
An XBox phone sounds amazing.  For all the kvetching about Microsoft being in the console business, it is a moneymaker for them -- and would compete well with the DS and similar devices.

Sony wasn't originally in the console business either...

Ditto for Nintendo...
briandnewby
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briandnewby,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/28/2014 | 7:48:13 PM
Re: What's in a name?
Right, but to my point (barely :-), Sony and Nintendo didn't buy a console platform.

I just don't think I would try and enter the mobile market by buying a handset provider unless I was thinking I could barrel my way in, Richard Branson style (and he didn't buy a handset provider).

I know from being on the telecom side, the carriers need Microsoft much more than Microsoft needs them.  Er, well, at least needed Microsoft a few years ago.

If there is an xBox phone, you read it here first!  To some degree, xBox and Bing are Microsoft's best assets going forward.  Office is kind of the cash cow and operating systems are in decline.  The rest of the business, in my view, is probably better off dead (or spun off).
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/29/2014 | 11:19:30 PM
Re: What's in a name?
Microsoft Bing : Google Search :: Google Buzz : Twitter

Except Bing Maps is better than Google Maps (at least, since Google "updated" its Maps platform).
SarahReedy
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SarahReedy,
User Rank: Blogger
4/25/2014 | 4:17:13 PM
Re: What's in a name?
They had the best maps, but that's not something Microsoft is getting...
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 4:30:35 PM
Re: What's in a name?
Maps are not part of the deal with Microsoft? did that get spun off somewhere else? 
SarahReedy
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SarahReedy,
User Rank: Blogger
4/25/2014 | 4:38:12 PM
Re: What's in a name?
Nokia retained its location business services (along with NSN and its patents), so Microsoft doesn't own that.
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 4:43:11 PM
Re: What's in a name?
Oh, its a much thiner deal than I had thought. hmmmm
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Light Beer
4/25/2014 | 8:24:04 PM
Re: What's in a name?
I read somewhere that their location services are supposed to be a 'diamond in the ruff' with a huge upside. I don't see what's so different but I guess that's TBD.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/26/2014 | 1:20:28 AM
Microsoft didn't buy the whole Nokia
Sarah, 

"Microsoft didn't delve into other specific plans for Nokia, but a leaked lettersuggests it will be leaving behind the once iconic Nokia name in favor of "Microsoft Mobile." 

That's different from I have heard in Finland and Nokia. Nokia employees I know, who work in Finland and The UK and have been transferred after the deal was closed, have said this week that the company's name is still Nokia, adding "the same, but different."

Although maybe a different name to that division helps in not having the confusion to what is Nokia and what is not. 

Microsoft didn't buy the whole Nokia. 

-Susan
SarahReedy
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SarahReedy,
User Rank: Blogger
4/28/2014 | 11:34:58 AM
Re: Microsoft didn't buy the whole Nokia
Thanks for the insights, Susan. It sounds like "Microsoft Mobile" may have just been the name for behind-the-scenes legal stuff, so it would make sense that it's keeping the Nokia name. Elop was rather non-commital about it today. What do you think about that tagline? Clearly in Finland there is still a lot of affinity for the brand.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Light Beer
4/28/2014 | 9:49:34 PM
Re: Microsoft didn't buy the whole Nokia
I think the name Nokia holds more weight than something like "MSFT Mobile"...
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/29/2014 | 11:13:07 PM
Re: Microsoft didn't buy the whole Nokia
What about MobileSoft?  ;)

Oh, wait... It's taken.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/26/2014 | 2:47:48 AM
Nokia
thebulk, 

HERE Maps is not parts of the deal with Microsoft. Maps remains with Nokia. The deal with Microsoft includes the handset division only.

The manufacturing sites were not transferred to Microsoft. Nokia has kept its other businesses and the manufacturing site in India. And Nokia will close its manufacturing site in South Korea. 

Nokia and Microsoft have now a service agreement and Nokia will manufacture mobile devices for Microsoft. This makes sense due to the well known high quality of Nokia's hardware. 

-Susan
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/26/2014 | 6:04:01 AM
Re: What's in a name?
Ariella, 

Yes, you're right. Nokia was one of the cuting-edge technology companies until 2007 when Apple introduced the iPhone. Read what I wrote to thebulk below to learn more. I included some links. 

-Susan
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/26/2014 | 9:01:16 PM
Re: What's in a name?
@Susan Thanks for filling us in. I know you know a lot of about the compnay, having read some of your articles on it. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/26/2014 | 1:12:01 AM
Re: What's in a name?
@thebulk: Will definitely do!  When I recorded the test call, it sounded like the devil making a prank obscene phone call.

No wonder I lost that female friend.  :p
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/26/2014 | 5:49:26 AM
Lack of knowledge
thebulk, 

"And no doubt Nokia was never on the cutting edge of any mobile technology. At best they were several years behind everyone else." 

That's not true.

You shouldn't make such a statement having such lack of knowledge on Nokia's history, or mobile phone history for that matter. 

FYI, by 1998 Nokia had established itself as the world leader in mobile phones sales. Nokia combined high quality hardware design with cutting-edge technology. The other two mobile phones leaders were Swedish Ericsson and Motorola. 

Only Apple in 2007 with its iPhone could knock Nokia off the top, where it had been since the 80s. Interesting enough, Apple did it following Nokia's original winning formula of great design aesthetics and usability.

As The Wall Street Journal wrote in its article Noting Nokia's History, Nokia was one of the world's cutting-edge technology companies and until 2012 the world's largest maker of cellphones, quite the opposite to what you said. 

I suggest you should read a little about Nokia before making more untruthful comments, as you did.

Stephen Elop (the fist non-Finnish CEO and something that had a great deal to do with the "deal" we are discussing today) convinced Nokia that the only way out for Nokia after losing its position was to cut jobs worldwide like crazy and sell to Microsoft. A story that remains fishy up-to-date.   

I should add that Nokia's supply chain management has been focus of case studies repeatedly and is still considered an example of agile supply chain management.  

-Susan 
SarahReedy
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SarahReedy,
User Rank: Blogger
4/25/2014 | 4:14:50 PM
Re: What's in a name?
Woah that's quite the testament to the resiliciency of the phone (and of you!). Glad you're okay! If it weren't an iPhone, it would have shattered everywhere adding extra injury with the glass chards.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/26/2014 | 1:14:42 AM
Re: What's in a name?
Reminds me of an absolutely awesome case I used to have on an old iPhone I had.  I stepped on that thing and dropped it a ton for over two years, and it stayed perfectly fine.

It took dropping the phone three stories down the atrium of a hospital onto the hard tile floor of the lobby below to finally break the phone -- and the screen didn't even crack!  The screen and home button just kind of half-popped out.  It was fixable (except the quality of reception was never the same) and continued to work until I banged the phone against something lightly some weeks later.  Probably fixable again, but I just got a new one.

I think the name of the phone case company was AGF.  They make amazing cases.
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/26/2014 | 2:19:13 PM
Re: What's in a name?
@Joe, 

That case sounds amazing! I will see if I can find one here in Bangkok, I am always droping my iphone. 

and that phone recording sounds funny as hell (pun intended) 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/28/2014 | 6:11:14 PM
Re: What's in a name?
@thebulk: It was truly an awesome case.  Here's the company's website: http://www.agfindings.com/
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/29/2014 | 2:54:36 AM
Re: What's in a name?
Awesome, thanks for the link, Joe! 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/26/2014 | 9:03:16 PM
Re: What's in a name?
@Joe sounds like the commercials I used to see (way back in the last century) for the standard phones. I believe it was from At & T, claiming that they torture their phones to be sure they meet their standards for durability. Of course, cell phones are far from durable, and they need cases to protect them. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/27/2014 | 9:39:56 AM
Re: What's in a name?
@Ariella: It would be neat to see durability become a USP again and see commercials like that for cell phones.

But then, so far the consumer market is resigned to the fact expensive cell phones are easy to break...  I suspect the big guys are making too much money to make highly durable cell phones.

(Then again, there is the anecdote of Steve Jobs berating his employees over his scratched iPhone prototype, noting that people keep both their phones and their keys in their pockets.)
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 12:00:57 PM
Re: What's in a name?
I personally think it's a fine idea to phase out the Nokia name and rebrand the whole thing.  I rather hope that Microsoft improves significantly upon Nokia's technology too.  I had owned numerous Nokia phones in my time; eventually my dissatisfaction got the better of me once I discovered that there was a better world of cell phones out there waiting for me.  Indeed, the main reason I haven't switched over to a Windows phone is because I didn't want to deal w/ a Nokia again.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/25/2014 | 4:02:09 PM
Re: What's in a name?
I just saw this on the Nokia deal: It ends with this: "In her opening statement during Thursday's call, Hood said Nokia's business results have undoubtedly changed in the months since Microsoft struck the deal. She said Microsoft is still "committed to achieving annual cost synergy targets of at least $600 million within 18 months of close." 

What is it with the corporates speak? How does "cost synergy" differ from ordinary cost?
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/27/2014 | 9:36:26 AM
Re: What's in a name?
Yeah, I have two degrees and I have no idea what the heck that's supposed to mean.
SarahReedy
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SarahReedy,
User Rank: Blogger
4/28/2014 | 9:32:00 AM
Ask Elop
Stephen Elop is answering questions over on Nokia Conversations right now: http://conversations.nokia.com/2014/04/28/conversations-live-ask-anything-stephen-elop/ The first one lobbed at him was about what's happening with the Nokia name, which he dodged.
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/28/2014 | 11:46:31 PM
Nokia's Indian plant
Why is Indian plant out of the deal? After all India claims to have one of the largest youth population in the world. Is it because that plant is setup to assemble and manufacture low end phones, in which Microsoft is not interested? I am just guessing here.
Kruz
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Kruz,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/29/2014 | 10:30:26 AM
Re: Nokia's Indian plant
MSFT is interested in low end phones but it has 2 other alternatives in China and Vietnam. This is why it is not that excited about keeping the Indian option.
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/30/2014 | 12:06:41 AM
Re: Nokia's Indian plant
harles: China and Vietnam makes sense. However India is imposing certification requirements on consumer electronics: www.enterpriseefficiency.com/author.asp?section_id=2405&doc_id=272965& This would raise difficulty for phones manufactured in Vietnam and China to be readily sold in India.
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/29/2014 | 10:15:06 AM
the name
@Charles: I think the value of the mobile brand name Microsoft or Nokia would vary region to region. Nokia has better recognition in South Asia, Europe and Asia. Microsoft mobile probably resonates more in Americas.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/29/2014 | 11:15:30 PM
Re: the name
I think this is something important for analysts (especially those who love to do nothing but pooh-pooh everything Microsoft does while bending over for Google and/or Apple) to remember.  There's more to this industry than the Americas (let alone North America).  Microsoft has a very real opportunity to make a big name for its mobile brand in Europe and Asia.  Perhaps it will find its way into deeper American penetration by first achieving broader European and Asian penetration.
briandnewby
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briandnewby,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/30/2014 | 12:44:03 PM
Re: the name
I do agree about the international opportunities.  I'm not convinced that the Nokia purchase will help Microsoft there.  It may.  Diebold, for instance, got into the voting machine business by buying an equipment company in Brazil and hoped to transfer that to the United States, only to find the technology wasn't robust enough.  Diebold then bought Global Election Management for the current voting machines in use and has since sold that business for nearly nothing.

That's only one, and rather odd example, and it illustrates the technology coming this way and not that way, internationally, but overall I think buying domestic equipment to create an international beachhead is risky as well.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/30/2014 | 11:03:03 PM
Re: the name
Interesting (and obscure -- which always makes for interesting) example, brian!

In any case, Microsoft has clearly been in the market for a mobile company... My anti-Nokia sentiments aside, who better to buy than Nokia if you're Microsoft?
briandnewby
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briandnewby,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/1/2014 | 4:31:17 PM
Re: the name
Joe, I don't know who I would buy.  I think they'd be better off assembling their own, ala Amazon.

The only thing I can get to is that the intellectual property must have had great value.  

The other thing to consider, I guess, aside from the international thought is simply the new idea of new market space for devices.  Microsoft could leverage all of this into some new Internet of Things concept that creates new value and makes Microsoft look visionary.

Of course, that's what analysts wondered when E-Bay bought PayPal.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/8/2014 | 8:25:28 AM
Re: the name
The eBay/PayPal comparison is really apt here.  In eBay's case, PayPal was making tons of money off of eBay, so may as well buy PayPal and make that money that eBay should have been making in the first place.

Ditto for Microsoft/Nokia, perhaps.  Windows phones are Nokia phones, so why not make ALL of the money on the table for Windows phones?  At least, if the ROI is right.
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/2/2014 | 9:43:16 AM
Re: the name
@Joe: In terms of technology trends, tech elite in Europe and Asia follow the tech elite of Americas, so I am not sure how gaining market share in Asia will help gaining market share in America. Or am I missing something here?
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/8/2014 | 8:27:52 AM
Re: the name
> *tech elite in Europe and Asia follow the tech elite of Americas*

Relevant xkcd.

Besides, that statement, however true, became less true after the Snowden revelations -- when Europeans, South Americans, and others fled the American cloud like it was a burning movie theater.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Light Beer
4/30/2014 | 5:45:06 PM
Re: the name
I would actually disagree with that. I think people have already soured on the 'Windows' mobile & pphone moniker. Microsoft in the name wouldn't make too much of a shift in my mind.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/30/2014 | 10:59:55 PM
Re: the name
OTOH, when all you read (and I'm not making this assumption of you, but I'm assuming it's true of many visitors here) are American-based tech news sites, then yes, eventually you start to believe that Microsoft is the devil; that Mark Zuckerberg does horrible, disgusting things with the world's personal data in the middle of the night; that every Google product ever is a new Wonder of the World; and that Steve Jobs was the best person ever except sometimes when he was the worst person ever.
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Sales Director of INIT on Plug & Play Switch Devices

9|19|14   |   3:21   |   (0) comments


INIT Italy uses both the Huawei S5700 and S7700 series switches for the campus LAN environment. Sales Director Andrea Curti says their company chose these Huawei devices over others because of their performance, flexible scalability and plug-and-play features.
LRTV Huawei Video Resource Center
Saudi Arabia Upgrades Vocational Training System

9|19|14   |   3:31   |   (0) comments


The Technical and Vocational Training Corporation (TVTC) has 100,000 students, 150 government-owned institutions and oversees 1000 private institutes. The CIO of TVTC explains that Huawei devices have allowed them to manage multiple datacenters using just one software program, scientifically tracking the progress of students and teachers, saving them millions.
LRTV Huawei Video Resource Center
Huawei's Media Solutions Are Here to Stay

9|19|14   |   4:35   |   (0) comments


The current media revolution requires rapid upgrades in technology. New formats (HD, 3D, 4K etc.) and the subsequent explosion of file sizes demand sophisticated network and storage architecture. Social media and the multiple distribution channels require a robust asset management system. Gartner analyst Venecia Liu speaks about the current technological trends in ...
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