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Nokia's Maps Land on Samsung Devices

Sarah Thomas
8/29/2014
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Nokia's quest to find new smartphone partners now that it's shed its handset division and Samsung's struggle to create an identity unique from Android have made the pair unlikely allies. Nokia's HERE unit said on Friday that Samsung would use its maps and location services on both its Tizen-powered smart devices and on its Android Gear line of devices.

The Samsung Corp. Gear S will be the first to feature an Android version of HERE's Navigator app for turn-by-turn walking and public transport directions. Nokia says HERE will be the exclusive mapping provider for all Samsung Gear devices via a licensing agreement.

HERE has also launched a self-titled Tizen app in beta for all Samsung Galaxy devices that lets users plan and calculate walking or public transit routes on their phones then send them to their smartwatch.

Nokia Goes Android


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Why this matters
As a standalone company, free from handsets, HERE's goal is now to "deliver fresh maps, platform services and location cloud experiences to as many people and businesses as possible, independent of the device and operating system they are using," Sean Fernback, senior VP of everyday mobility for HERE, said in a statement, noting that partnering with Samsung on Tizen is a huge step in that direction.

Samsung will be an important partner for Nokia, but it also speaks to the fact that the Nokia company still sees its future in smartphones. It was reported that part of the reason for the recent departure of CEO Michael Halbherr was disagreement over whether HERE's focus should be solely on the automotive and enterprise space or on its own consumer products. With him leaving this month, it looks the compromise is consumer products, but through partners.

That said, connected cars will be a huge focus too. Nokia HERE, which generates around 8% of the standalone Nokia's revenues, is already a dominant player in the connected car space, powering about 80% of car navigation systems through partners. The company also recently committed $100 million to the connected car sector to invest in innovative companies to bolster its business there.

This is an important partnership for Samsung as well, as the company has long been beholden to Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) and the Android OS. It's shot to the top of the pack because of it, but recently it has struggled to differentiate its devices from the plethora of other Android phone makers. With stiffer competition and a foray into wearables like connected watches, it's looking for an identity -- and services -- of its own.

Related posts:

— Sarah Reedy, Senior Editor, Light Reading

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/21/2014 | 6:47:14 PM
Re: Windows-based Samsungs?
@briandnewby: You should totally register for your free money, then!

Reminds me about how I had the dodecahedron theory of the shape of the universe years before any published scientists thought of it.  I'm like the unsung Stephen Hawking.
briandnewby
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briandnewby,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/16/2014 | 1:15:28 PM
Re: Windows-based Samsungs?
Joe, I actually had a dream in 2002 where I held an 8x10 PC type thing to my head and took a phone call.  Taking one on a tablet doesn't seem that far off, but at least there's Bluetooth.  My dream had what later become known as a "tablet" that I carried and used as a phone.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/15/2014 | 10:48:22 PM
Re: Windows-based Samsungs?
Interesting (and cute!).

I tried other models too, but I went through about a zillion 6310s.  I hated those things.
Kruz
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Kruz,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/14/2014 | 3:06:45 PM
Re: Windows-based Samsungs?
Its the Nokia 8210. The smallest device by nokia back then. It had a lot of success in times when Nokia ruled for straight 14 years.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/14/2014 | 7:26:20 AM
Re: Windows-based Samsungs?
"baby Nokia"?  What's that?

Reminds me of when I went to South Korea nearly 15 years ago -- well before cell phones were prolific in the US.  There, everyone -- and I do mean everyone -- had at least one cell phone.  Even small children had their own cell phones.  Even babies and toddlers would have little cell phones hanging from a lanyard around their necks.
Kruz
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Kruz,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/13/2014 | 7:40:01 PM
Re: Windows-based Samsungs?
I had the e72, 2110 and the lovely baby nokia.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/13/2014 | 7:34:55 AM
Re: Windows-based Samsungs?
@Kruz: What model did you have?  I went through several of them -- and multiple models.
Kruz
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Kruz,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/13/2014 | 3:25:35 AM
Re: Windows-based Samsungs?
Ouch. I understand your frustration. Strange to hear that though, my old nokia never gave up on me.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/12/2014 | 10:55:34 PM
Re: Windows-based Samsungs?
@Kruz: They broke ALL THE TIME on me.

In one instance, one of them made my voice sound like a demon speaking tongues.  Totally freaked out this girl I was interested in when I called her one night.  She's married to someone else now.
Kruz
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Kruz,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/10/2014 | 8:44:05 AM
Re: Windows-based Samsungs?
What didnt you like about it when the world was only feature phones?
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