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Cisco Pitches Vision for 'Internet of Everything'

Mitch Wagner
9/4/2014
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Cisco executives laid out precisely what the company means when it talks about the "Internet of Everything," answering the question, "Why don't they just call it the 'Internet of Things,' like everybody else does?"

The Internet of Everything means connecting "people, things, processes, and data" that had been unconnected, and turning information into action, said Padmasree Warrior, Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO) chief technology & strategy officer, speaking at an event in New York today streamed live over the Internet.

The Internet of Everything results in new business services, applications, capabilities and sources of revenue, Warrior said. Cisco estimates the opportunity at $19 trillion over the next decade in the private and public sector.

Making the Pitch
MLB Advanced Media helped Cisco pitch its vision of the 'Internet of Everything,' here conceptually illustrated by a photo of phormer Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Roy Halladay. 
Source: SD Dirk
MLB Advanced Media helped Cisco pitch its vision of the "Internet of Everything," here conceptually illustrated by a photo of phormer Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Roy Halladay.
Source: SD Dirk

The Internet of Everything will operate in every vertical -- healthcare, financial services, manufacturing and retail, Warrior said.

"Every company in the future will become a technology company," she said.

For example, in manufacturing, greater use of robotics, 3D printing and sensors will require a network to aggregate information. Businesses will also need to converge operations technology -- which Cisco calls OT -- and IT, Warrior said.

"A manufacturing company essentially becomes a technology company. IT becomes front and center in that technology company as a platform to drive business efficiency," Warrior said.

In retail, sensors in stores can help deliver offers and discounts on products that consumers are looking for, she said.

IT has a new mandate, with several drivers:

  • Mobile, which is not just new devices, but also about moving applications to new platforms
  • Cloud, driven partly by mobile, requiring distribution and virtualization of physical resources
  • The rise of sensors and the Internet of Things
  • And new categories of apps such as Box and Evernote, which require enhanced security.

Businesses require "fast IT" to meet new demands, Warrior said.

As part of the infrastructure for "fast IT," Cisco announced the next generation of its Unified Computing System (UCS) x86 servers, including the UCS Mini for remote offices, midmaket businesses, and to help provide compute for the Internet of Things; and the M-Series modular server for the next generation of data center applications. We wrote about that this morning. (See Cisco Goes Hyper With New UCS Servers .)

Warrior introduced Joe Inzerillo, executive vice president and CTO of MLB Advanced Media. The pro baseball Internet business unit sees more than 10 million downloads and 6 million daily users for its At Bat mobile app. MLB Advanced Media has also branched out to streaming other sporting events, such as the Masters and World Cup.

Customer demand gets more complicated, Inzirello said. "Which means the IT's got to get simpler. As these use cases get more and more elaborate, you have to start doing things in a much more repeatable way, and not spend your time spinning up boxes," he said.


Learn more about the Internet of Things on Light Reading's Internet of Things channel.


Cisco is attempting to build a new engine on its plane as it loses altitude. The networking equipment on which it has built its business is facing shrinking margins, increased competition, and even the distant but real threat of commoditization from SDN and other forms of virtual networking. To keep its business thriving, Cisco needs to reposition itself as a business partner to customers, not just a hardware provider.

As for what it means to service providers: For starters, carriers are businesses like any other, and face the same needs for instrumentation, sensors and customer customization and personalization. But service providers are also technology enablers to other businesses. At a basic level, the Internet of Everything will require new network needs and bandwidth. More than that: Enterprises are looking for service providers to partner with them on delivering IT services.

— Mitch Wagner, Circle me on Google+Follow me on TwitterVisit my LinkedIn profileFollow me on Facebook, West Coast Bureau Chief, Light Reading. Got a tip about SDN or NFV? Send it to wagner@lightreading.com.

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Executiv37157
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Executiv37157,
User Rank: Light Beer
11/27/2015 | 2:24:21 PM
Final Solution Offering
I'm looking to see what Cisco ends up providing in the space. They seem to focus on some great potential areas, but may have too many focus areas at the moment. I see them helping fill the Managed Security Service Area fairly well, but time will tell.

Jason Lebrecht 
sam masud
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sam masud,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/8/2014 | 2:11:43 PM
A third way
Forget Internet of Everything or Internet of Things--how about calling it Internet X?

 

It's a thought anyway.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/7/2014 | 2:11:56 PM
Re: Cisco's reputation in software development?
GE had earlier demostrated its ability to wrap up everything into a structure that closely represented the internet of everything, in GE's case they called it the industrial internet, where they managed to tie down entire sensor network systems, clients, different areas of expertise, engineers, managers, etc into one malleabe layer of information. And to access it, the only thing you had to do was have a smartphone.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/7/2014 | 2:07:36 PM
Re: Cisco's reputation in software development?
"That does seem to be a very good summary of what's going on. Whether ever company will become a "technology company" as they seem to hope for, is probably an iffy proposition to bet the bank on. Cisco is maybe trying "Everything" in it's search for a more profitable future."

No, not just profit. Bank value has got nothing to do with Cisco's vision. Whenever a company sets some goals, whether or not they can accomplish those, their main priority is create enough buzz to carry them on even if they do not make too much profit. Cisco is only advancing because it realizes the potential to get so much value from creating a self services web of companies.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Blogger
9/7/2014 | 5:08:42 AM
Re: Cisco's reputation in software development?
mhh, 

We don't have to always agree. :) Again, I don't agree with the following: 

" ... if Cisco didn't have great developers for its platforms in the past, it might not in the future." 

That's not a rule. You are basically saying that someone who hasn't performed well in an area in the past can't improve and perform better in the same, or different area. 

In any case, to what exactly you are making reference when doubting about Cisco's performance? 

-Susan 
mhhf1ve
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mhhf1ve,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/5/2014 | 4:42:15 PM
Re: Cisco's reputation in software development?

As the Internet of Things and the Internet of Everything are relatively new concepts it doesn't really matter too much anything that has been done, or not in the past. 

Hmm. Can't say I can agree with that. The past may not be a great predictor of the future, but software developers don't just magically appear overnight.... So if Cisco didn't have great developers for its platforms in the past, it might not in the future. Then again, everything is relative, so it might only need marginally better developers than its competitors... and THAT might not be a high bar in this field of IoE.

 

Atlantis-dude
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Atlantis-dude,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/5/2014 | 12:48:00 PM
Technology company
Every company is already one in some form or the other. Will they want to continue to buy hw and how does that make a big difference to them? 
kq4ym
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kq4ym,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/5/2014 | 9:33:39 AM
Re: Cisco's reputation in software development?
"Cisco is attempting to build a new engine on its plane as it loses altitude. The networking equipment on which it has built its business is facing shrinking margins, increased competition, and even the distant but real threat of commoditization from SDN and other forms of virtual networking. To keep its business thriving, Cisco needs to reposition itself as a business partner to customers, not just a hardware provider."

That does seem to be a very good summary of what's going on. Whether ever company will become a "technology company" as they seem to hope for, is probably an iffy proposition to bet the bank on. Cisco is maybe trying "Everything" in it's search for a more profitable future.
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Blogger
9/5/2014 | 5:16:54 AM
Re: Cisco's reputation in software development?
mhhf1ve,

As the Internet of Things and the Internet of Everything are relatively new concepts it doesn't really matter too much anything that has been done, or not in the past. Cisco can be great developing its Internet of Everything and it seems it's doing a good job already. 

-Susan 
mhhf1ve
50%
50%
mhhf1ve,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/4/2014 | 6:16:01 PM
Cisco's reputation in software development?
Does anyone have an opinion on Cisco's reputation as a software developer? I'm guessing if people generally don't hold Cisco's software in high regard, then it might be difficult for Cisco to push into becoming a business partner for hardware services that require nicely integrated hardware.
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