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Can Comcast Beat Customer Hate With a Private Cloud?

Mitch Wagner
6/15/2017
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SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Cloud Foundry Summit -- Facing the most negative customer feedback of any company, Comcast is rebuilding its customer service platform to be more responsive to customer needs.

With the lowest Net Promoter score of any business, Comcast has a big problem with customer satisfaction. It sees technology as part of the solution -- a way to reduce the duration and frequency of problems, and get faster response to customers when problems do occur.

Three years ago, Comcast turned to private cloud based on Cloud Foundry as the foundation of its customer service platform. And the operator has been overwhelmed by their success. To pick just one metric: When IT began discussing the platform in 2014, they promised business leaders the private cloud could help produce a 40% reduction in the duration of customer problems. IT was worried that might be too ambitious.

Fast-forward to 2017, and Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) has blown the doors off that promise, producing an 81% reduction -- a little more than double the commitment IT worried might be overambitious.

Comcast executives discussed their private cloud experiences at two sessions at Cloud Foundry Summit. I wrote about it on Light Reading's sister site, Enterprise Cloud News: Comcast Looks to Beat Customer Hate With Private Cloud.

And while you're there check out the two other stories we've done from the conference so far:

— Mitch Wagner Follow me on Twitter Visit my LinkedIn profile Visit my blog Friend me on Facebook Editor, Enterprise Cloud News

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f_goldstein
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f_goldstein,
User Rank: Lightning
6/28/2017 | 7:56:26 PM
Re: Nope
Comcast is pretty smart at the highest level, knowing how much to spend on acquisitions, doing big deals, etc. But at the operational level, it's the old Chrysler Corp., where an insistence on squeezing every last dime out of every process creates failure, not higher profit. This is a comapny that makes every effort to show its customers that it truly hates them, no matter how much they pay. Tech tools don't help when the systems and human processes are both so utterly hostile to users.

Their X1 platform has a lot of clever tech in it, but it's stil utterly user-hostile, with the UI version of jagged sharp edges all over it. We were forced into it and none of the family can stand it. Testing? What's that? And its use of the cloud just slows down responsiveness. Buzzwords are no substitute for actual user testing.
kq4ym
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kq4ym,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/28/2017 | 12:42:35 PM
Re: Nope
The claim that they projected a "40% reduction in the duration of customer problems" and ended up with double that to about 80% seems pretty remarkable although what they define as reduction in the duration of problems might be a little bit sketchy if you looked at other customer complaints as well.
Mitch Wagner
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Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
6/18/2017 | 4:02:41 PM
Re: Nope
Both are necessary. The company needs the tools and the will to use them. 
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/17/2017 | 1:24:16 PM
Re: Nope
I thought the big problem was on the consumer side of the business?

Look, if Comcast is doing a terrible job with businesses, they would just leave. With the consumer side, that's a bit harder. 
KBode
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KBode,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/16/2017 | 3:00:10 PM
Re: Nope
I agree completely. There's almost an active disdain for consumers at many of these companies that filters from the top down.

And many of the problems (like substandard subcontractor hiring processes, or the lack of competition that allows less organic punishment for poor service) aren't fixed magically by the cloud. 
Phil_Britt
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Phil_Britt,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/15/2017 | 10:36:24 PM
Re: Nope
I fully agree. I'm in a locality with more than one provider. I switch to Comcast a decade ago for a "deal." The first day I was sorry as they would put the cable into the house only "at the closest spot," not where I wanted it. It was a one-year deal, I went back to the other provider as soon as I could. Comcast offers somewhat better speed, plus remote WiFi connections, but the terrible customer service means I wouldn't switch and I would dread a corporate merger between the two.
Duh!
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Duh!,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/15/2017 | 4:50:43 PM
Re: Nope
More important, business processes,systems, training, on-shoring, network upgrades.  They're making credible efforts, but have a long way to go.
macemoneta
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macemoneta,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/15/2017 | 3:08:22 PM
Nope
Technology won't change customer dissatisfaction. It's a culture change that's required, 
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