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Cisco's Videoscape Leader Resigns

Jeff Baumgartner
LR Cable News Analysis
Jeff Baumgartner
8/3/2011
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Enrique Rodriguez, the Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) exec who joined Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO) in 2010 to lead the launch of Videoscape, has resigned, Light Reading Cable has learned.

Cisco didn't give a reason for Rodriquez's departure, which was announced internally on Monday, but multiple sources say he left on his own accord. One industry source said Rodriguez opted to leave amid a power struggle centered on the future direction of Cisco's video division.

Cisco did confirm that it has combined its service provider and enterprise video business under the leadership of Marthin De Beer, the SVP of Cisco's Emerging Business Group.

"We believe this move will spur innovation and synergies across Cisco's end-to-end video portfolio, which spans service provider, enterprise and consumer networks, and enable Cisco and our customers to introduce compelling new video services, applications and experiences with speed and agility," Cisco said, in a statement.

De Beer will also serve as acting GM for Cisco's Service Provider Video Technology Group (SPVTG) as the company seeks Rodriquez's replacement. His successor is expected to report to De Beer.

Rodriguez, who previously handled Microsoft projects such as Mediaroom and Zune, joined Cisco in May 2010 as SVP and GM of Cisco's SPVTG. In January at the Consumer Electronics Show, Cisco unveiled Videoscape, an architecture designed to help MSOs and other service providers deliver video services to TVs, PCs, smartphones, tablets and other IP-connected devices.

It's been trying to win deployments and fleshing out components for it ever since, also viewing Videoscape as another way to help drive set-top sales. In February, Rodriquez identified 2013 as the anticipated "sweet spot" for Videoscape deployments. (See CES: Cisco Unveils Master Plan for Video, Can Videoscape Save Cisco's Set-Top Business? and Cisco Paints Inlet Into Its Videoscape .)

Cisco says Rodriguez's departure has no bearing on the company's continued focus on video. (See Chambers Promises a Simpler Cisco.)

"Our commitment to Videoscape doesn't change," the official said.

It's believed that Rodriguez's departure is not directly connected to a broader Cisco reorganization that's resulting in the laying off of 6,500 employees and the sale of its set-top plant in Juarez, Mexico. (See Cisco Simplifies; Cuts 6,500 Jobs, Cisco Cutting 6,500 Employees, Foxconn Buys Cisco's Set-Top Factory and Did Cisco Cut Deep Enough?)

— Jeff Baumgartner, Site Editor, Light Reading Cable

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sam masud
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sam masud,
User Rank: Light Sabre
12/5/2012 | 4:57:04 PM
re: Cisco's Videoscape Leader Resigns


Regarding the move by Cisco to combine its SP and enterprise video business, I wonder why Cisco did not do this earlier. Anyhow, here's my question:


While clearly SPs and Enterprises have different requirements, aren't there some areas (like video cited above) where the distinct blurs? The increasing popularity of cloud services would seems to suggest this...

Pete Baldwin
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Pete Baldwin,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 4:57:01 PM
re: Cisco's Videoscape Leader Resigns


The distinction does kind of blur between service provider and enterprise video, but they still seem like separate worlds. In a sense, quality matters more on the service provider side -- you've got unforgiving consumers there, versus the enterprise where employees 1) can't be "lost" as customers and 2) probably don't care that much most of the time.


I also tend to equate service provider video with TV and movies -- long videos that can be cached -- and enterprise with live videoconferencing and pre-recorded short videos. that might be narrow-minded of me, though.

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