Light Reading
Despite a decline in video buffering rates, multiscreen viewers expect much greater improvements in video streaming quality than service providers are delivering so far.

Multiscreen Viewers Want Better Views

Alan Breznick
3/31/2014
50%
50%

Although the quality of streaming video may be improving at a modest pace, it's not improving nearly fast enough for the majority of video viewers.

In a new study on the state of video streaming released Monday, Conviva Inc. reported that consumers are notably less tolerant of video buffering delays and other playback problems than they were just two years ago. In one sign of this growing intolerance, the study found that the amount of time lost from a viewing session with a 1% increase in buffering more than doubled from three minutes in 2011 to eight minutes in 2013. This indicates that viewers switched away from videos with buffering issues a lot sooner than before.

In another sign of growing consumer impatience with poor video streaming delivery quality, the Conviva study found that viewers particularly bolt if they experience playback problems while watching live sports, entertainment, or other live action events in HD. The average viewing time of live action programming in HD plunged from 40 minutes to just one minute when users ran into buffering delays.

Such delivery quality problems will likely make it tougher for service providers to attract and retain subscribers for their multiscreen video offerings. "In those instances, one bad viewing experience on a single device puts all screens at risk," said Colin Dixon, founder and chief analyst of nScreen Media, in a prepared statement. "Continuity of quality across screens is very important."

While streaming video delivery quality is not improving as quickly as consumers want or expect, it is steadily improving, according to Conviva. Its latest global study of 45 billion video streams sent across more than 1.6 billion playback devices found that video buffering actually fell from 39.3% in 2012 to 26.9% last year.

In another sign of improvement, Conviva found that low-resolution delivery of video streams dropped to 43.3% last year from a whopping 63% in 2012. But, even with that improvement, "more than two in five views were grossly inferior video quality, " the firm said.

The increasing emphasis on streaming video quality comes as more consumers are clearly watching more video on more devices. In a corresponding survey of streaming households, Conviva found that the number of concurrent streaming devices in use increased by 28% from 2012 to 2013. This finding corroborates recent research from other organizations. (See Nielsen: Multiscreen Viewing Taking Off.)

Further, Conviva's data shows that different video playback devices are preferred by consumers at different times of the day. In the 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. period, mobile devices emerge as the favorite, accounting for 6.9% of all video streamed daily. PCs take over in the afternoon slot from noon to 4 p.m., accounting for 16.3% of all daily video streams. Then, as might be expected, the TV rules in the evening window from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., accounting for 36.6% of all streaming video.

— Alan Breznick, Cable/Video Practice Leader, Light Reading

(12)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
TaraSeals
50%
50%
TaraSeals,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/3/2014 | 4:35:22 PM
Re: Which devices?
Really great point Phil-- I think a lot of this does go back to truth in advertising! 
Phil_Britt
50%
50%
Phil_Britt,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/1/2014 | 3:04:40 AM
Re: Which devices?
Tara,

I would go one step further. Once people have an excellent video experience, like at a Best Buy or competitor (as a demo) or see the demonstration of one at a conference or on a commercial, they expect all video to be as good as advertised/experienced, without realizing the excellent ones are done under laboratory conditions, not real-life conditions. 

Power fluctuations, transmission issues and a myriad of other items can prevent the "perfect" experience at home.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/31/2014 | 11:10:29 PM
Re: Which devices?
I too am more willing to accept it on my phone (to a certain degree), but that's primarily because I don't do much video watching on my phone; I have the most basic data plan and rarely come close to exceeding it.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/31/2014 | 11:08:22 PM
Re: Watching what?
6am-10am is peak time for commuting to work -- not to mention going to the gym before work.  Tons of people watch videos (Netflix, Hulu, Youtube, etc.) on their phone on the subway or the bus, or on the treadmill.
pcharles09
50%
50%
pcharles09,
User Rank: Light Beer
3/31/2014 | 10:06:41 PM
Re: Watching what?
Good Morning America!
DOShea
50%
50%
DOShea,
User Rank: Blogger
3/31/2014 | 10:00:21 PM
Watching what?
Who is watching video on their mobile phones between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m., and what are they watching?
Liz Greenberg
50%
50%
Liz Greenberg,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/31/2014 | 9:24:57 PM
Re: Which devices?
I agree with you Sarah but I think that the average user doesn't really distinguish between the capabilities of WiFi versus the mobile network (4G, LTE, etc) and therefore just thinks that it is bad reception.  Most people ask me "What is the difference between WiFi and Cellular?  Aren't they the same?"  So it will be interesting to see what happens over the next 12 months with more LTE and WiFi but also what the carriers will do to degrade the experience based on trying to meter Netflix and the like!
TaraSeals
50%
50%
TaraSeals,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/31/2014 | 7:01:19 PM
Re: Which devices?
I know-- it's really interesting. I personally think that the wireless experience is getting so much better with 4G that the average consumer's expectations are improving overall.
SarahReedy
50%
50%
SarahReedy,
User Rank: Blogger
3/31/2014 | 6:22:59 PM
Re: Which devices?
I am surprised by that study findings. I have different expectations for my WiFi network versus LTE versus 3G versus cable. I guess improving technologies mean that people no longer excuse certain networks. Might be time to stop dumbing down the multiscreen viewing experience.
TaraSeals
50%
50%
TaraSeals,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/31/2014 | 5:53:11 PM
Re: Which devices?
I agree that it's totally unacceptable on the TV considering how much cable bills are--and I would guess that most people agree.

But a survey from Parks Associates has found that consumers expect the same TV user experience throughout their home, regardless of whether the service is offered over the top (OTT), a managed terrestrial operator network, satellite or other delivery mechanism. That study interestingly found that expectations also remain the same regardless of the receiving device, including set-top box or connected CE device.

The connected home research further found that users want all of the bells and whistles of a traditional pay-TV service within the user interface for OTT.

"While some operators might see OTT delivery or use on a connected CE device as a way to offer a slimmed-down version of their user interface, consumers still expect the full-feature service and interface experience regardless of how it is delivered to the TV," said Brett Sappington, director of research at Parks Associates.

So...a possible differentiation point?
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Educational Resources
sponsor supplied content
Educational Resources Archive
Flash Poll
LRTV Custom TV
VeEX – Live from the Show

8|21|14   |   5:58   |   (0) comments


An overview of VeEX Test and Measurement solutions including TX300S multi-service test set with VeExpress cloud-based management system, UX400 universal modular platform supporting 100G testing, and the redesigned RXT modular platform.
LRTV Custom TV
Transitioning CE 2.0 Networks Into the SDN & NFV Era With Telco Systems

8|19|14   |   5:19   |   (0) comments


Telco Systems' Ariel Efrati (CEO) and Moshe Shimon (VP of Product Management) discuss virtualization and how the company's new Open Metro Edge solution utilizes the SDN and NFV concepts to accelerate and orchestrate service delivery through its innovative product portfolio and software applications.
LRTV Custom TV
NFV Myths: Is NFV Still Several Years Away?

8|11|14   |   1:13   |   (0) comments


Some say that NFV (network functions virtualization) is still several years away from being implemented on mobile operator networks. This isn't the case. Operators can get started on their paths to NFV now, as this short video from Skyfire shows.
LRTV Custom TV
A New Security Paradigm in SDN/NFV

7|28|14   |   02:54   |   (0) comments


Paul Shaneck, Global Director Network Solutions for Symantec, discusses the evolving virtualized network, explaining how Symantec is leading the security discussion as it relates to SDN and NFV, and helping to ensure the network is protected and compliant.
LRTV Documentaries
Sprint's Network Evolution

7|24|14   |   14:59   |   (0) comments


Sprint's Jay Bluhm gives a keynote speech at the Big Telecom Event (BTE) about Sprint's network and services evolution strategy, including Spark.
LRTV Documentaries
BTE Keynote: The Software-Defined Operator

7|24|14   |   18:43   |   (1) comment


Deutsche Telekom's Axel Clauberg explains the concept of the software-defined operator to the Big Telecom Event (BTE) crowd.
Light Reedy
Numbers Are In: LR's 2014 Salary Survey

7|24|14   |   1:25   |   (7) comments


Our fourth annual Salary Survey paints a picture of who's hiring, firing, earning, and yearning for a change in the telecom industry.
LRTV Custom TV
Driving the Network Transformation

7|23|14   |   4:29   |   (0) comments


Intel's Sandra Rivera discusses network transformation and how Intel technologies, programs, and standards body efforts have helped the industry migration to SDN and NFV.
LRTV Custom TV
Distributed NFV-Based Business Services by RAD

7|18|14   |   5:38   |   (0) comments


With the ETSI-approved Distributed NFV PoC running in the background, RAD's CEO, Dror Bin, talks about why D-NFV makes compelling sense for service providers, and about the dollars and cents RAD is putting behind D-NFV.
LRTV Custom TV
MRV Accelerating Packet Optical Convergence

7|15|14   |   6:06   |   (0) comments


Giving you network insight to make your network smarter.
LRTV Custom TV
NFV-Enabled Ethernet for Generating New Revenues

7|15|14   |   5:49   |   (0) comments


Cyan's Planet Orchestrate allows service providers and their end-customers to activate software-based capabilities such as firewalls and encryption on top of existing Ethernet services in just minutes.
LRTV Custom TV
Symkloud NVF-Ready Video Transcoding, Big Data

7|9|14   |   3:41   |   (0) comments


Kontron and ISV partner Vantrix demonstrate high-performance video transcoding and data analytic solutions on same 2U standard platform that is ready for SDN and NFV deployments made by mobile, cable and cloud operators.
Upcoming Live Events!!
September 16, 2014, Santa Clara, CA
September 16, 2014, Santa Clara, CA
September 23, 2014, Denver, CO
October 29, 2014, New York City
November 6, 2014, Santa Clara
November 11, 2014, Atlanta, GA
December 9-10, 2014, Reykjavik, Iceland
June 9-10, 2015, Chicago, IL
Infographics
Today's Cartoon
Hot Topics
Level 3 Does Big Data Differently
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 8/21/2014
Comcast Streams Back to School
Mari Silbey, Independent Technology Editor, 8/21/2014
Sprint Drops Prices, But Also Speeds?
Sarah Reedy, Senior Editor, 8/21/2014
Line-Powered Phone Lines: A Hot Topic Again
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 8/20/2014
A New Verizon App Store? Say It Ain't So
Sarah Reedy, Senior Editor, 8/20/2014
Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed