& cplSiteName &

Docsis 4.0

Jeff Baumgartner
The Bauminator
Jeff Baumgartner
1/3/2008
50%
50%

OK, let's be clear on one thing from the get-to. There's no such thing as Docsis 4.0... at least not yet. And probably not for a long, long time.

But who's to stop a big vendor like, say Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO), from at least proposing some Docsis 4.0ish ideas? Well, nobody, apparently.

That was one of the things that caught my attention as my eyes flitted about the schedule for this month's Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers (SCTE) Conference on Emerging Technologies, set to run from Jan. 14-16 in Los Angeles.

I was intrigued that on tap is a discussion about a paper titled: A Proposal for Docsis 4.0: The Best of Both Worlds -- Docsis and PON. Alon Bernstein, a software architect at Cisco, is listed as the presenter.

Of course, we'll apply the benefit of the doubt here and consider that a vendor's proposal for something dubbed Docsis 4.0 is just tongue in cheek. After all, just throwing around a term like Docsis 4.0 is sure to attract some attention. At least it got mine for a split second.

Docsis 3.0, as we already know, is just getting off the ground, and CableLabs just awarded its first set of qualifications to cable modem termination systems based on the new specs. So believing the industry is anywhere near even discussing anything formal about a new Docsis spec is pure fantasy. (See Cisco, Arris & Casa Make the CableLabs Grade.)

And the idea of introducing PON to the cable environment isn't exactly new. Several vendors, Cisco and its Scientific Atlanta unit included, have already been pitching the idea of using "cable PON" schemes, particularly in limited areas and situations that call for MSOs to pull fiber all the way to the customer premises. (See Moto Expands 'CablePON' Strategy, CommScope Sees BrightPath for Cable FTTP, SA Pitches Cable PON, RFOG Update , and Sifting Through the RFOG.)

Although it's all in good fun, Cisco might want to tread carefully when throwing terms like Docsis 4.0 about. Recall the legal spanking Terayon Communications (now part of Motorola Inc. (NYSE: MOT)) got a bit more than seven years ago for claiming its S-CDMA technology would be part of an erroneous spec called Docsis 1.2. S-CDMA was later included in Docsis 2.0, but investors weren't exactly forgiving about the whole exercise.

Then again, Cisco's just proposing an idea, and its use of the term should be taken in that context. Then again (again), Cisco isn't a small fry like Terayon was back in the day. It can do this sort of thing and probably get away with it without too much screaming and hand-wringing.

— Jeff Baumgartner, Site Editor, Cable Digital News

(0)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
More Blogs from The Bauminator
Don't expect anything more to pop for a while, but one analyst sees John Malone & Co. as the 'logical, ultimate acquirer of Ziggo' if the price is right
Cable operators will need to free up at least 24MHz of spectrum for Docsis 3.1. But why is that the magic number?
Liberty Media's rumored plan to snag a 25% stake in Charter for $2.5B could aid the MSO's M&A strategy
Top US cable operators lost 1.41 million video subs in 2012, but the bleeding continues to show signs of slowing in a saturated pay-TV market
Aereo streams its 'no cable required' tagline into the video world. Will consumers tune in to the message?
Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading founder Steve Saunders grills Cisco's Roland Acra on how he's bringing automation to life inside the data center.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
February 26-28, 2018, Santa Clara Convention Center, CA
March 20-22, 2018, Denver Marriott Tech Center
April 4, 2018, The Westin Dallas Downtown, Dallas
May 14-17, 2018, Austin Convention Center
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
SmartNICs aren't just about achieving scale. They also have a major impact in reducing CAPEX and OPEX requirements.
Hot Topics
Here's Pai in Your Eye
Alan Breznick, Cable/Video Practice Leader, Light Reading, 12/11/2017
Verizon's New Fios TV Is No More
Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 12/12/2017
Ericsson & Samsung to Supply Verizon With Fixed 5G Gear
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 12/11/2017
Cloudy With a Chance of Automation: Telecom in 2018
Iain Morris, News Editor, 12/12/2017
Juniper Turns Contrail Into a Platform for Multicloud
Craig Matsumoto, Editor-in-Chief, Light Reading, 12/12/2017
Animals with Phones
Don't Fall Asleep on the Job! Click Here
Live Digital Audio

Understanding the full experience of women in technology requires starting at the collegiate level (or sooner) and studying the technologies women are involved with, company cultures they're part of and personal experiences of individuals.

During this WiC radio show, we will talk with Nicole Engelbert, the director of Research & Analysis for Ovum Technology and a 23-year telecom industry veteran, about her experiences and perspectives on women in tech. Engelbert covers infrastructure, applications and industries for Ovum, but she is also involved in the research firm's higher education team and has helped colleges and universities globally leverage technology as a strategy for improving recruitment, retention and graduation performance.

She will share her unique insight into the collegiate level, where women pursuing engineering and STEM-related degrees is dwindling. Engelbert will also reveal new, original Ovum research on the topics of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, security and augmented reality, as well as discuss what each of those technologies might mean for women in our field. As always, we'll also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air and chat board.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed