& cplSiteName &

Tricking Hulu

Jeff Baumgartner
5/26/2010

11:45 AM -- As of 10:50 a.m. ET today Hulu LLC had not stepped in to block the latest version of Hillcrest Labs 's Kylo browser from playing back videos from the site. I fired up the updated version of Kylo this morning and a clip from Saturday Night Live worked just fine:

All Systems Go

However, simply downloading and installing the new Kylo browser isn't enough to sidestep Hulu's video blocking techniques. Users still have to make some manual adjustments to make it work. (See Hillcrest Creates Hulu Workaround for TV Browser.)

To trick Hulu, Kylo users must pull up the browser's "Settings" page, select "Compatibility," and then select the "Behave like" option to pick the correct mode. Kylo offers five modes: Firefox, iPad, PlayStation, Sarafi, or Wii.

To get Hulu to run right, users must then pick the Firefox mode, and then enter www.hulu.com in the text field labeled "When browsing." Users must then select "Add custom site behavior" as the final step.

Not exactly the most super-intuitive approach. I had to ask for the steps, but following them was relatively simple and did the trick on the first try.

And this way of tricking Hulu into believing that it's accessing a regular computer browser isn't all that new, apparently. NewTeeVee noted earlier this week that users of Android-powered handsets can circumvent Hulu's blocking techniques by adjusting the "user agent" setting on the phone's Chrome browser so it thinks it's running on a PC.

The story was written in the context of the upcoming Google TV service, wondering if all these tweaks and adjustments will create an ongoing game of cat-and-mouse between Hulu and a legion of new browsers and devices that want to help consumers feed Hulu's content to big screen TVs. (See Google TV Comes Out, the World Tunes In .)

So far, it looks like Hulu's giving the "new" Kylo a pass, but we'll try to check back throughout the week to see if the workaround continues to be effective.

— Jeff Baumgartner, Site Editor, Light Reading Cable

(0)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
More Blogs from The Bauminator
The 10G future is in sight, HFC has gas in the tank, Comcast is getting serious about network virtualization, DOCSIS's pioneers get recognized and more from last week's show in The Big Easy.
New name and logo will adorn devices that conform to an emerging next-gen broadcast TV signaling standard designed to support 4K interactivity and aimed for widespread deployment in 2020.
Under fire from US broadcasters, Locast is appealing for funds to help it mount a legal defense, a move that was attempted eight years ago by Ivi Inc., an OTT-TV company that was sued out of existence.
Xfinity Flex, now offered for free to broadband-only subs, provides streaming apps and smart home capabilities – but it's also something else.
Cable op has quietly launched the Contour Stream Player, Cox's twist on Comcast's Xfinity Flex video streaming product for broadband-only subs.
Featured Video
Upcoming Live Events
October 22, 2019, Los Angeles, CA
November 5, 2019, London, England
November 7, 2019, London, UK
November 14, 2019, Maritim Hotel, Berlin
December 3-5, 2019, Vienna, Austria
December 3, 2019, New York, New York
March 16-18, 2020, Embassy Suites, Denver, Colorado
May 18-20, 2020, Irving Convention Center, Dallas, TX
All Upcoming Live Events
Partner Perspectives - content from our sponsors
Multiband Microwave Provides High Capacity & High Reliability for 5G Transport
By Don Frey, Principal Analyst, Transport & Routing, Ovum
5G + Cloud + AI + Ecosystem, Opening New World of Video
By Samuel Chen, President, Cloud & Data Center Marketing, Huawei
All Partner Perspectives