x

This Week in WiMax

8:30 AM -- This week in WiMax, here are the big issues, as I see them:

  • Why Cisco will rake in WiMax winnings
    After the U.S. gubmint formally opened the application process for the initial tranche of its broadband stimulus funds, our pal Dan Jones surmised (and we agree) that WiMax will be the "technology of choice" for many of the funding-hopeful applicants. Pretty simple to reason why: Compared to other "4G" wireless technologies, WiMax is actually a solid standard, and there is gear available, today, from multiple providers. And compared to fiber or DSL plays, WiMax offers service providers a potentially cheaper capex outlay, especially in rural areas where fewer towers might be needed. So, more bang for the taxpayer's buck.

    While we also agree that WiMax-specific providers like our friends at Alvarion Technologies Ltd. (Nasdaq: ALVR) should do well in deals linked to the stimulus largesse, it's also a pretty safe bet that WiMax newcomer Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO) will rake in its fair share of WiMax-bid spoils. If WiMax does indeed lead the stimulus tech charge, even if Cisco doesn't win the radio side of the deal, each WiMax deployment will still need IP-based expenditures in the network's core -- a playing field Cisco knows quite well. And yes, small service provider, if you need help financing those expensive-router purchases Cisco will be only happy to help. After all, it's not like the BTOP funds will be paid with worthless IOUs. In the U.S. Treasury, Cisco can trust.


  • Looking for WiMax, finding Ma Bell
    Here's a stupid Google trick that may or may not say something about the competition WiMax is bringing to the broadband market. Just type in "WiMax" (or "WiMax Portland") to the regular Google Web search and see if you don't get what we get a lot recently: A top-level sponsored link (aka an advertisement) with the headline "Wimax" and below it this copy:
      att.com/enterprise Local, National or Global Business? AT&T Can Provide Network Solutions.

    Scared of WiMax or just smart marketing to businesses who might be considering a change of providers? We report, you decide.


  • Plugfest
    Need to know more about Clearwire and WiMax? My Clearwire NTK report costs less than a box o' Kentucky grilled bird. Just $4.95 at the Sidecut store. Also available for the Kindle.

  • – Paul Kapustka is the founder and editor of Sidecut Reports, a WiMax analysis site and research service. He can be reached at [email protected]. Special to Unstrung.

mobileinsider 12/5/2012 | 4:00:19 PM
re: This Week in WiMax



As a US tax payer, I sure hope that my taxes will NOT be used for continued underwriting of a technology which is not "borderless" but limited to pockets of counties and rural or regional locations. If deployed as a fixed only solution, then it has merits. If deployed as a mobile technology choice by a small regional operator, it would be the same being equipped with a desktop tethered to the wall (might as well be if my area is limited to 5x5 miles) while everyone else is sporting a laptop with 3G dongles with world access. My views at http://tinyurl.com/ctw83x

Let's fund mobile broadband technologies with merits beyond our very own borders. But I guess that would be logical.

Twitter/mobileinsider




kaps 12/5/2012 | 4:00:05 PM
re: This Week in WiMax

Since Mobile WiMAX is currently deployed and being used all over the world -- Russia, Japan, Taiwan, Europe, Pakistan -- not sure what your point is, other than weak.


And if LTE wins in the long run if you build for WiMAX today you get to keep your IP backbone -- this is Cisco's point -- so it's not a complete bet in one direction or the other. But for funds available this year and next, WiMAX remains one of the few technologies available on the shelf.

kaps 12/5/2012 | 4:00:05 PM
re: This Week in WiMax

Since Mobile WiMAX is currently deployed and being used all over the world -- Russia, Japan, Taiwan, Europe, Pakistan -- not sure what your point is, other than weak.


And if LTE wins in the long run if you build for WiMAX today you get to keep your IP backbone -- this is Cisco's point -- so it's not a complete bet in one direction or the other. But for funds available this year and next, WiMAX remains one of the few technologies available on the shelf.

mobileinsider 12/5/2012 | 3:59:56 PM
re: This Week in WiMax



To clarify: My "weak point" is...try taking a Clearwire or "Rural Provider" WiMAX card (or one of the many WiMAX phones) and try to roam across USA...or touch down in Europe or AsiaPac and "roam away" freely.  If the card or WiMAX phone works everywhere you go - then my point is indeed weak. 

As stated, if WiMAX is used as a fixed broadband replacement for Cable or DSL (if such options are not available) then the solution makes sense. If mobility is a requirement, then I opt for an HSPA or CDMA solution (no rush for LTE to compete with WiMAX Powerpoint claims). Either way, I hope more thought and technology sense is applied when politicians start dishing out people's tax money (but who am I kidding?).

Twitter/mobileinsider




kaps 12/5/2012 | 3:59:56 PM
re: This Week in WiMax

Part of the allure of WiMAX mobility -- even if it is just in a small rural served area -- is the simple fact that by implementing mobile WiMAX you don't need truck rolls, etc., so it cuts down deployment costs. Plus from all I can tell the gear on all ends -- infrastructure to CPE -- is less expensive than traditional cellular or landline operations. (no trenches) So until I hear otherwise, WiMAX seems like a good cost/value choice, especially in rural areas where the spectrum may be not so expensive or is already in hand.


As of yet, WiMAX is not the choice for wandering road warriors -- but that is not the demographic targeted by the funds. The point, as far as I can tell, is to provide access to underserved or non-served areas. And if the rural providers are all in the 2.5 GHz spectrum band, why wouldn't the gear work when roamed to other WiMAX regions? Like Wi-Fi it may take a bit of time to shake out (and to figure out billing/roaming issues) but if you trust in standards and compliance (and, in reality, not too many suppliers anyway) is it so hard to believe that WiMAX providers won't offer roaming in the near future?


As far as international use goes, the spectrum differences will likely limit WiMAX roaming for the near term, but I doubt that 3G providers have a seamless alternative solution when they can't even cover this country yet with a reliable signal. And we haven't even started asking questions about whether the big providers have enough spectrum to expand much more -- or do you not mind those tax dollars going toward a technology with built-in prohibitions against using things like Skype or Slingbox? That hardly seems like a move toward the future.

kaps 12/5/2012 | 3:59:56 PM
re: This Week in WiMax

Part of the allure of WiMAX mobility -- even if it is just in a small rural served area -- is the simple fact that by implementing mobile WiMAX you don't need truck rolls, etc., so it cuts down deployment costs. Plus from all I can tell the gear on all ends -- infrastructure to CPE -- is less expensive than traditional cellular or landline operations. (no trenches) So until I hear otherwise, WiMAX seems like a good cost/value choice, especially in rural areas where the spectrum may be not so expensive or is already in hand.


As of yet, WiMAX is not the choice for wandering road warriors -- but that is not the demographic targeted by the funds. The point, as far as I can tell, is to provide access to underserved or non-served areas. And if the rural providers are all in the 2.5 GHz spectrum band, why wouldn't the gear work when roamed to other WiMAX regions? Like Wi-Fi it may take a bit of time to shake out (and to figure out billing/roaming issues) but if you trust in standards and compliance (and, in reality, not too many suppliers anyway) is it so hard to believe that WiMAX providers won't offer roaming in the near future?


As far as international use goes, the spectrum differences will likely limit WiMAX roaming for the near term, but I doubt that 3G providers have a seamless alternative solution when they can't even cover this country yet with a reliable signal. And we haven't even started asking questions about whether the big providers have enough spectrum to expand much more -- or do you not mind those tax dollars going toward a technology with built-in prohibitions against using things like Skype or Slingbox? That hardly seems like a move toward the future.

mobileinsider 12/5/2012 | 3:59:55 PM
re: This Week in WiMax

I agree that there should be no restrictions with regard to applications such as Skype, Slingbox, etc. AT&T do not restrict Slingbox use from what I have heard and seen. Sveral European operators allow for Skype usage (for best effort VoIP). I also agree that more 3G spectrum will be needed by 2013-14 as more peer to peer apps will be used, the emergence of cloud computing, and increased uptake of video uploads and 1:1 + 1:many communication.


Twitter/mobileinsider

HOME
Sign In
SEARCH
CLOSE
MORE
CLOSE