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Security Platforms/Tools

Verizon Offers Industry-Specific Security Advice

Seven years into publishing its annual analysis of data breach information, Verizon is taking a new approach, combining big data analysis with 10 years of data breach records to produce information specific industries can use to make their networks safer. (See Verizon DBIR Focuses Security by Industry.)

The 2014 Data Breach Investigations Report, known as the DBIR, goes beyond what past reports have delivered, says Verizon Enterprise Solutions 's Marc Spitler, senior analyst and DBIR co-author, to give enterprises more information on which they can act. After analyzing 63,000 incidents and 1,600 confirmed data breaches, Verizon determined that 90% of these fall into one of nine incident patterns. (By the way, you can download a copy of the report here.)

"These incidents patterns are analyzed, and they are mapped to particular industries, because we believe that will make it more actionable to those industries," Spitler says. "We think this is the proper evolution of what we are doing because people want more analysis and more advice on what to do."

By focusing on the type of incidents that most often affect their specific industry segment, enterprises can make more efficient use of the information Verizon is providing. That's particularly important because most industries are hit harder by a limited number of attack types, Spitler says.

What Verizon found is that most industries face the greatest threat from only three of the nine data threat patterns. Those patterns are:

  • Crimeware: malware intended to gain control of systems
  • Insider/privilege misuse
  • Physical theft/loss
  • Cyber-espionage
  • Denial-of-service attacks
  • Web app attacks
  • Point-of-sale intrusions
  • Payment card skimmers
  • Miscellaneous errors such as directing email to the wrong person

That's not to say the 2014 DBIR isn't full of its usual juicy tidbits about trends in cybercrime, because it is. For example, cyber-espionage is up, with the number of incidents reported totaling three times what was reported in 2013, although that is due in part to a greater data set. Many data breaches today happen stealthily and can take a long time to identify, leading to greater damage.

For the first time, the Verizon DBIR chose to address DDOS attacks and found these are getting stronger every year. DDOS attacks compromise network resources and can be either a distraction to the real data breach or an intended disruption of business. Financial services, retail, professional, information, and public sector enterprises all count DDOS attacks among their main threats.

The number one way of getting information remains use of stolen or hacked passwords, and DBIR authors say that makes a strong case for two-factor authentication.

Interestingly, retail point-of-sale attacks, which have been in the news of late, are actually on the wane in terms of volume, the DBIR notes.

Verizon issues its annual DBIR in part to highlight its own Verizon Managed Security Services which delivers, among many other things, two-factor authentication capabilities.

— Carol Wilson, Editor-at-Large, Light Reading

Carol Wilson 4/22/2014 | 3:22:35 PM
Re: Social Engineering One of the DBIR's findings this year is that many data breaches go unnoticed for a substantial period of time. 

Certainly that was the case with many of the retail breaches this year, like the Target and Lord&Taylor incidents. Information gathering can be done over a long period of time, which means the impact of the breach is much greater. 

That puts a premium on not only trying to prevent breaches but on identifying them more quickly, which I think depends more on the ongoing analysis and tracking of LAN and WAN activity. 
danielcawrey 4/22/2014 | 3:18:32 PM
Social Engineering Getting stolen or hacked passwords probably comes from phishing attempts. It would seem, in my estimation, one of the easiest ways to procure authentication information. 

Social engineering is a bit different in that oftentimes a user doesn't realize they have been hacked for a long time. This type of intrusion can go unnoticed for a lengthy amount of time, and can reap a treasure trove of information for malicious actors. 
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