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Cloud enablement

Euronews: Sept. 21

Telecom Italia is up in the cloud, Austrian operators are getting down to LTE business, and the European Commission is laying down the law in today's roundup of European telecom news.

  • Europe’s broadband agenda just got a kick in le derrière as the European Commission announced sweeping measures to help bring faster broadband to more people, including a policy to free up spectrum in the 800MHz band by 2013 and a recommendation to clarify how fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) networks should be regulated across the region. The EC’s grand broadband plan is for all Europeans to have basic broadband coverage by 2013, and by 2020 the aim is for all EU citizens to have fast broadband of 30 Mbit/s with at least half of European households subscribing to 100-Mbit/s services. Neelie Kroes, EC vice president for the digital agenda, called fast broadband “digital oxygen,” and we all need more of that. (See Europe's 'Digital Oxygen' and EC Sets Digital Agenda.)

  • Telecom Italia (TIM) has launched a cloud service, offering on-demand computing and applications capabilities to enterprises and government agencies on a pay-per-use basis. The carrier, which has called its service the “Italian Cloud,” believes the market in Italy for such services will be worth €300 million (US$394 million) in 2012. (See T Italia Launches Cloud Services.)

  • Austria looks set to be Europe’s next Long Term Evolution (LTE) hotspot. The four mobile operators there have acquired 2.6GHz spectrum, which is suitable for the next-generation mobile broadband technology, for a combined total of just €39.5 million ($51.8 million) in an auction.

  • It's a bad first day at the office for new Nokia Corp. (NYSE: NOK) boss Stephen Elop as news emerges that the handset maker's supposedly iPhone-challenging N8 model is going to be delayed for several weeks. (See Nokia N8 is Late .)

    In other European news:



    — Paul Rainford, freelance editor, special to Light Reading

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