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Cloud enablement

7 Truths About Cloud Computing

Cloud services represent another way to go vertical
BT is already targeting four specific markets -- financial markets, global commerce, consumer package goods, government and health care -- developing specific knowledge of those industries and using that knowledge to create industry-specific services. Verizon, which has created business units around key verticals such as the health care industry, is also creating industry-specific cloud services. This is one area in which network service providers can distinguish themselves from Web-based offers, although they will face competition here from large systems integrators, and have to invest in industry-specific expertise to succeed:

Mobility and cloud services are a natural fit
As more mobile users need access to data from smartphones and tablets, putting that data in the cloud makes sense. But the real winners are the companies that not only provide access to the data but also have the ability to use that data in meaningful ways, and combine with other capabilities such as presence and policy. This only gets more compelling as machine-to-machine (M2M) communications takes hold, says Verizon's Chris Geselle. (See Verizon Biz Supports 'Bring Your Own Device' ). There are many partnership options for cloud services
Even the smallest of service providers can get into cloud relatively quickly, because there are a lot of companies eager to help. At the Carrier Cloud Forum, firms such as Parallels Holdings Ltd. , AppDirect and CHR Solutions Inc. were on hand to share expertise, and we'll have more on their efforts in coming days. (See Charter Clouds Up For SMBs.)

Still very early days for cloud, change is on the way
Security, particularly for customer data, is critical, but so are a range of service-level agreements (SLAs) for availability, performance and other characteristics yet to develop. Cloud needs to remain on-demand and pay-as-you-go, but beyond that will likely evolve in many different directions:

Previous page: Too Soon for Standards?

— Carol Wilson, Chief Editor, Events, Light Reading

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h3net.com 12/5/2012 | 5:05:25 PM
re: 7 Truths About Cloud Computing

I agree with this opinion, however one thing that is overlooked in the telecommunications world is the difference between how licensed carriers are held accountable for their service offerings (tariffs, usf, cabs,etc) vs. the cloud computing  carriers who seek to keep all their costs down and drive market prices for such resold services. We certainly want to support our Cloud Computing Client providers and develop solutions around their needs. Like SMS enabled DIDS, and SIP Trunking.


HyperCube is a licensed competitive wholesale carrier. H3net.com


 

Stevery 12/5/2012 | 5:05:22 PM
re: 7 Truths About Cloud Computing

Any talk of reliability?  Anyone think they can do better than Amazon's 2 nines?  (or did they make it to one?)

cnwedit 12/5/2012 | 5:05:21 PM
re: 7 Truths About Cloud Computing

Yes, there was lots of talk of reliability - especially given Amazon's recent outage.


The challenge there seems to be a market education issue --will enterprises be willing to pay more for higher availability, greater security and better reliability? That may well be a decision they make on an application by application basis-- for some apps, they are wiilling to have a higher risk profile than for others. And the type of risk will vary also.

paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 5:05:21 PM
re: 7 Truths About Cloud Computing

 


I guess I disagree wholeheartedly with what has been typed here by Stevery.


Cloud at the Enterprise level will be a replacement for my iron.  If I use the cloud in a way that has lots of single points of failure then shame on me.  This to me is no different than having my iron (and I run iron in datacenters) without redundancy in servers, bandwidth, and data center.  Even for my local office, I have 2 different carriers that bring bandwidth in.  One is intended to be strictly a backup so it is not 100% redundancy (like 1+1), but it is on a different carrier and even on a different technology (my primary is an Opt-E-Man and my backup is a broadband wireless).


If I am a SMB and buy some of the more advanced services like the AWS storefront, I am very much locked into a single service.  On the other hand, companies of this size are unlikely (to me) to have the redundant data centers and lots of extra iron.


My personal opinion is that people view "The Cloud" as a way out of thinking about proper architecture and design.  I note that Netflix has been up and operational not only through the Amazon thing but the Sony thing (and my Netflix client is on my PS3).


seven


 

Stevery 12/5/2012 | 5:05:21 PM
re: 7 Truths About Cloud Computing

> -will enterprises be willing to pay more for higher availability, greater security and better reliability?


The answer is simple:  No.  At least, not enough to make a business.


I think the cloud guys have really painted themselves into a corner.  A major sell point was the purported reliability and to let somebody else worry about the problem.  Amazon truly screwed the pooch on this:  Now if I don't own the bare metal, I don't trust other companies to get it right, especially because they are financially incentivized to cut every corner they can.

cnwedit 12/5/2012 | 5:05:20 PM
re: 7 Truths About Cloud Computing

It is still very early days for most cloud services and part of the process will be educating the business customer as to exactly what he or she is getting, as well as what is at risk.


Any system can fail, the question is, what happens when it does? What are the backup systems, how much survivability is built in and for what, how does the service provider communiticate the problem, etc. I think the Amazon outage was a wake-up call but not the death knell of cloud services.


Service providers may be able to differentiate in the cloud by the different levels of service and SLAs they offer, allowing the customer to choose what level of risk they are willing to accept.

paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 5:05:19 PM
re: 7 Truths About Cloud Computing

 


Stevery,


I expect that Amazon has LOTS of single points of failure.  My point is that if I am using Amazon Compute power, I should also have Rackspace compute power.  I should set my service up so that I can turn up services and manage them across multiple providers.


And yes, I expect Netflix gets a lot more attention than your average small customer.  I look at what I do.  I have completely redundant data centers in disperse geographic locations.  If I want to move to virtual hardware, I expect I need separate providers and multiple bandwidth vendors.


seven


 

Stevery 12/5/2012 | 5:05:19 PM
re: 7 Truths About Cloud Computing

> and SLAs they offer, allowing the customer to choose what level of risk they are willing to accept.


You have good points.  The one above is a bit tricky:  The Amazon customers thought they had chosen one level of risk, but ended up with something else entirely.

Stevery 12/5/2012 | 5:05:19 PM
re: 7 Truths About Cloud Computing

> If I use the cloud in a way that has lots of single points of failure then shame on me. 


Have you had a chance to dig into the Amazon fiasco?  I'd love to hear your readout, because it supposedly did just this. 


>  I note that Netflix has been up and operational not only through the Amazon thing but the Sony thing (and my Netflix client is on my PS3).


I would be suspicious that Netflix is so large a customer that their cloud gets a bit more attention than SMBs.

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