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Broadband services

SlideshowOn Broadband, FCC Talks Carrots, Not Sticks

San Jose CIO Shireen Santosham at the mic at the FCC's Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee (BDAC) meeting.
San Jose CIO Shireen Santosham at the mic at the FCC's Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee (BDAC) meeting.

kq4ym 8/3/2017 | 1:52:11 PM
Re: No mandate. While as noted the "agency's intention in creating model codes for broadband deployment is not to impose a federal mandate," I'm not so sure I'd call it a "carrot." It seems it more of a lets stop regulating for awhile and see if the marketplace can take care of itself. While maybe not so good eventually for consumers, we'll have to wait and see how it all works out for the the next several years.
KBode 7/21/2017 | 1:58:17 PM
Re: No mandate. "However, I am aware that not all communities act in good faith. And that many just don't know what's reasonable or don't have the resources to deal with managing telco relationships effectively."

Yes, each city is different. I remember when telcos were pushing into video local franchise reform was uniformly demonized because SOME cities were difficult in franchise negotiations and asked for too much. The "solution" was state-level video franchise laws that worked in some areas, but in others gutted consumer protections and in some locations -- even eminent domain rights. 

So yes, this consistently requires a more nuanced approach than just "all government, everywhere, always....is always bad." 
msilbey 7/21/2017 | 9:33:49 AM
Re: No mandate. There's got to be some happy medium as far as the fees are concerned. Cities shouldn't find themselves out of pocket when having to manage the permitting process. There is an administrative burden there. And, given that telcos are using public assets, it's reasonable for the government managing those assets to want to something besides just an at-cost return. Municipal officials need to advocate on behalf of their citizens, and that means working for benefits like public WiFi services and digital inclusion programs that help get more people connected. 

However, I am aware that not all communities act in good faith. And that many just don't know what's reasonable or don't have the resources to deal with managing telco relationships effectively. 

Ultimately, making more broadband services available to more people is good for everyone. The more everyone understands that, and what the actual costs and benefits involved in this process are, the better. The communities that do this well should come out on top, and hopefully that will be an incentive to others to follow the same path. 
davidhoffman5 7/21/2017 | 8:41:12 AM
No mandate. No mandate. Do nothing. Cities get to ask for extortion levels of fees for all kinds of social nonsense. Result will be little deployment progress. Same as before.
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