Facebook Gets Its Drone On

Ray Le Maistre
Shades of Ray
Ray Le Maistre, Editor-in-Chief
7/22/2016



Is it a bird? Is it…. OK, enough of that. It's Aquila, the giant unmanned high-altitude Facebook drone designed to help provide Internet access to remote areas that has, according to the social media giant, just taken its first major test flight.

You can read a full account of the flight and why Facebook is investing in drones, satellites and other wireless technologies, in this official blog, which includes a video with some stunning images.

Aquila, The Internet 'Eagle'
Aquila is the Latin word for eagle and, in classic mythology, was the pet eagle of Zeus that carried his thunderbolts. Today, it is a giant, solar-powered drone delivering packets... (Photo from Facebook)
Aquila is the Latin word for eagle and, in classic mythology, was the pet eagle of Zeus that carried his thunderbolts. Today, it is a giant, solar-powered drone delivering packets... (Photo from Facebook)

As a reminder, this is an aircraft that, according to Zuckerberg's crew, will be able to fly for up to three months at a time (solar-powered) and provide connectivity from more than 60,000 feet using millimeter wave (mmWave) and laser technology. It's actually quite mind-boggling.

Why should we care? Well, whether people like it or not, the whole world is becoming a digital society that, in one way or another, is going to be connected to networks and for many that will open up many new opportunities that will affect their lives and prospects. But more than half of the world's 7.4 billion inhabitants are not connected to the Internet. Bridging the digital divide is important -- everyone should at least have the chance to benefit from the information and communications capabilities that networks have to offer, if they choose to.

Should bridging that divide be the responsibility of global megacorps such as Facebook and Google (Nasdaq: GOOG)? Well, they're investing in these programs and in technology because either a) others aren't b) others are doing it too slowly, or c) others are doing it in a way that doesn't meet their aspirations/goals. They are filling what they see as a void and it's hard to imagine they are going to announce the suspension of programs such as Internet.org anytime soon.

For more on such remote connectivity initiatives, see:

— Ray Le Maistre, Circle me on Google+ Follow me on TwitterVisit my LinkedIn profile, Editor-in-Chief, Light Reading

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