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Security Strategies

SlideshowLevel 3: Security Is Company-Specific

Level 3's Chris Richter

ITProjec39942 10/7/2016 | 2:45:11 AM
it is amazing to think that some companies Carol, it is amazing to think that some companies don't even know the architecture of where their data is, the access points, etc., let alone the level of security risk for their data.

What this suggests to me is that not everyone has evolved with the evolution of technology/data and are not designing, let alone securing and managing, their systems, networks, and data relative to the changing values.  If one just listens to the recent interview with lowongan kerja the infrastructure manager that Steve Saunders conducted with LinkedIn's Infrastructure Manager, one can see the need and value for good design, prioritizing, keeping track of the changes, and navigating.  That, on top of the example you use of audits to "assess" risk, suggest entirely new assessments and addition to company security efforts. thanks a lot
cnwedit 12/8/2015 | 12:39:56 AM
Re: Level 3: Company-Specific Security It is surprising how much of the vulnerability of enterprises is based on their own behavior - good and bad - but if you think about it, things such as mergers and acquisitions or new product rollouts and technology changes are happening separate of the security issues and it's likely that the security folks are being dragged in last minute, if at all. 

So there is an accumulation of things and it takes a careful audit or assessment, as Chris Richter states, to detect where problems exist and possibly have existed for a long time. This is why managed security services is a huge opportunity for network operators that get it right. 
DHagar 12/7/2015 | 9:29:11 PM
Re: Level 3: Company-Specific Security Carol, it is amazing to think that some companies don't even know the architecture of where their data is, the access points, etc., let alone the level of security risk for their data.

What this suggests to me is that not everyone has evolved with the evolution of technology/data and are not designing, let alone securing and managing, their systems, networks, and data relative to the changing values.  If one just listens to the recent interview with the infrastructure manager that Steve Saunders conducted with LinkedIn's Infrastructure Manager, one can see the need and value for good design, prioritizing, keeping track of the changes, and navigating.  That, on top of the example you use of audits to "assess" risk, suggest entirely new assessments and addition to company security efforts.
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