Eurobites: Ericsson fined $207M by DoJ

Also in today's EMEA regional roundup: Arm opts for US listing; STC and Huawei cozy up; knackered old phone boxes preserved for posterity.

Paul Rainford, Assistant Editor, Europe

March 3, 2023

3 Min Read
Eurobites: Ericsson fined $207M by DoJ

Also in today's EMEA regional roundup: Arm opts for US listing; STC and Huawei cozy up; knackered old phone boxes preserved for posterity.

  • Ericsson has agreed to enter a guilty plea and pay a fine of almost $207 million relating to "non-criminal breaches" of its Deferred Prosecution Agreement (DPA) with the US Department of Justice. The Swedish vendor had entered into the DPA in a bid to resolve previously disclosed violations centering on allegedly corrupt practices in a number of countries, most notably Iraq, where it was accused of making payments to unknown parties and using "alternate transport routes" at a time when the Islamic State terrorist organization controlled some of the country's roads. Ericsson CEO Börje Ekholm said in a statement: "Taking this step today means that the matter of the breaches is now resolved. This allows us to focus on executing our strategy while driving continued cultural change across the company with integrity at the center of everything we do." Figure 1: (Source: Ericsson) (Source: Ericsson)

    • Arm, the UK-based but SoftBank-owned chip design firm, has decided not to go for a UK stock exchange listing this year, opting instead for a Nasdaq listing in the US. As the Guardian reports, the decision has been made despite lobbying from the British government, which is keen to see post-Brexit Britain become a hotbed of tech company flotations. (See As SoftBank preps IPO, Boris tries to Arm the FTSE .)

    • Saudi Telecom Company (STC) has signed a memorandum of understanding with Chinese vendor Huawei to enable the two companies to build an "all-optical strategic partnership." They are looking to cooperate in areas such as 50G PON, working towards what they call the "F5.5G era" – in other words, geared toward the nascent F5.5G (fixed 5th generation advanced) industry standard published by ETSI last September.

    • BT has completed the refurbishment of its Riverside Tower office building in Belfast, Northern Ireland, rendering it a suitable home for around 2,000 employees. The refurb was carried out as part of BT's Better Workplace program, a five-year initiative that sees the operator move from having around 300 locations in the UK to around 30, swankier, ones. Figure 2: Where is everybody? (Source: BT) Where is everybody?
      (Source: BT)

    • Nine rare phone boxes in and around the northern English city of Hull have been preserved for prosperity on the advice of Historic England, an organization that seeks to protect what are considered historically and culturally significant buildings and other landmarks. The boxes in question are K8 models designed by Bruce Martin, who was commissioned by the General Post Office in the 1960s to come up with more stripped-down replacement for the iconic K2 and K6 boxes designed by Giles Gilbert Scott. The boxes being saved here are particularly unusual as they are cream-colored, not red – Hull was the only place in the UK where the phone boxes were owned by the local council rather than British Telecom. (Kcom now runs the Hull network.) Figure 3: It's grim up north, but at least their phone boxes are a different color. (Source: Historic England Archive) It's grim up north, but at least their phone boxes are a different color.
      (Source: Historic England Archive)

      — Paul Rainford, Assistant Editor, Europe, Light Reading

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About the Author(s)

Paul Rainford

Assistant Editor, Europe, Light Reading

Paul is based on the Isle of Wight, a rocky outcrop off the English coast that is home only to a colony of technology journalists and several thousand puffins.

He has worked as a writer and copy editor since the age of William Caxton, covering the design industry, D-list celebs, tourism and much, much more.

During the noughties Paul took time out from his page proofs and marker pens to run a small hotel with his other half in the wilds of Exmoor. There he developed a range of skills including carrying cooked breakfasts, lying to unwanted guests and stopping leaks with old towels.

Now back, slightly befuddled, in the world of online journalism, Paul is thoroughly engaged with the modern world, regularly firing up his VHS video recorder and accidentally sending text messages to strangers using a chipped Nokia feature phone.

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