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Optical/IP

Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand

Amid talk of video-on-demand and music-on-demand, Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE: VZ) is now offering its wholesale customers bandwidth-on-demand. (See VZ Intros Bandwidth on Demand.)

The endeavor, announced yesterday, addresses what's normally a slow process. Adjusting an enterprise's leased-line bandwidth is not quite as simple as changing the bandwidth of a residential FiOS customer.

"Today, the lead times can be somewhat lengthy, because a series of networks have to be interconnected, which could include building fiber facilities," says Larry O'Neill, Verizon's product manager for bandwidth on demand at Verizon. "Somewhat lengthy" can mean several months.

Now, Verizon is saying that customers of its new bandwidth-on-demand service can have their request processed in hours and sometimes as little as minutes.

The initial setup requires some of the physical installations that would go into reconfiguring a customer's bandwidth needs under the current procedures -- in other words, Verzion does a preemptive buildout. Once the customer is set up, it pays a recurring fee for the luxury of bandwidth on demand.

But that's just the physical part. The ongoing challenge for making the on-demand service work lies in being able to allocate the bandwidth throughout the network.

"In other companies, external software does all of this, whereas our network equipment itself does it. It's still bandwidth on demand, but the differentiator is that they are taxing the software so much for the instant activation, they can't do other services. We have the ability to launch many more capabilities," claims O'Neill.

The service is available only in New York and is expected to be offered in Washington, D.C., in mid-2008. Afer that, it will slowly become available throughout Verizon's eastern footprint in National Football League cities.

— Raymond McConville, Reporter on Demand, Light Reading

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joferrei 12/5/2012 | 3:03:52 PM
re: Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand yep - check

http://www.lightreading.com/do...

Doctor_Disco 12/5/2012 | 3:03:52 PM
re: Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand Wow, what a great, new idea!

Didn't we have this with ATM SVC's and signaled PVC's years ago?

Raymond McConville 12/5/2012 | 3:03:48 PM
re: Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand No one ever claimed this was a brand new idea. In fact, we mention the fact that other companies are doing this. From the story:

"In other companies, external software does all of this, whereas our network equipment itself does it. It's still bandwidth on demand, but the differentiator is that they are taxing the software so much for the instant activation, they can't do other services. We have the ability to launch many more capabilities," claims O'Neill.
chillin 12/5/2012 | 3:03:44 PM
re: Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand Hasn't Comcast been doing this for ages with the power boost button?

It was supposed to be DOCSIS based speed increases for a period of time...

And it was free. Is it still there?
Pete Baldwin 12/5/2012 | 3:03:44 PM
re: Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand We did ask Verizon about what vendors they're using, and they gave us a bit of info.

The intelligent mesh they're using is built of Alcatel-Lucent LambdaUnite multiservice switches (now proud owners of one of the longest product names ever).

On the software side, Verizon only said that it's using a Telcoria OSS with some modifications.
tmmarvel 12/5/2012 | 3:03:44 PM
re: Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand Any idea what technologies is Verizon using for their BoD? Who are their vendors? What are the main applications?

There was a lot of talk about this during the bubble, but is there now actual demand for these services?
jepovic 12/5/2012 | 3:03:42 PM
re: Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand This is all fancy technology, but why?

Verizon is giving the customer a 100 MBit interface, rate limiting it to 30 Mbit and then use signaling to let the customer increase the bandwidth up to 100 Mbit.

In the carrier industry, this is done in a much simpler way. The customer is given a 100 Mbit line, and then measurements are used to determine the maximum bandwidth used (or actually the 98th percentile or something like that). This means that if the customer only uses eg 30 Mbit, that's what they pay for. If they use 60 Mbit, that's what they pay for.

This method fulfils the same customer requirements in a much simpler way. There is nothing needed in the network, just some OSS system that can pick up the statistics from the interface card. The 100 Mbit interface is needed either way. Anyone with telecom experience knows this is waaaaay simpler to operate!

And yes, it has been industry standard since maybe 10 years...
tmmarvel 12/5/2012 | 3:03:41 PM
re: Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand I gather that VZ and AT&T are gearing up their networks to be able offer end to end dynamic bandwidth connections, and even meshed dynamic BW networks, not just dynamic BW network access.

Are the concepts of ASON/ASTN now getting implemented in practice?

What might be the main applications? Corporate data backups? CDNs??
jwmarc 12/5/2012 | 3:03:41 PM
re: Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand Verizon partner solutions sells to the carrier space not the enterprise space as does verizon business service ( The MCI/VZ large busines sales channel). The wholesale service offering I would suspect is for the large carrier that requires SONET services provisioned quickly for which they already have significant interconnection at the SONET OC-n level. I dont believe that LCAS and VCAT services are contemplated for this service... you get OC-n level of capacity increases unless they are provisioning ethernet to achieve 30meg or 100meg service..but I would think this is expensive for most of their legacy SONET FOTs. In any event I applaud this service ... it is a long time coming and the major carriers will buy the service to cut down implementation time and avoid the ASR process.
jwmarc 12/5/2012 | 3:03:40 PM
re: Verizon Offers Bandwidth on Demand IMHO I would say that the gating factors are the revenue and operational considerations. ASRs generally require some workers involvement to handle the order and work it through the system with the countless other techs that touch the service request... the more people involved the higher cost... you know this i am sure... but when the service requests are not meeting internal indexes and on-time delivery failures start to creep you get really high costs and customer dis-satisfaction..Wholesale access revenues are the highest percentage of total VZ revenues..FIOS is eating into other resources -both monetary and human- anything to reduce the cost of service delivery and "people" involvement will help the bottom line.. i dont see the enterprise as a huge market... maybe the fortune 10 companies... but hey they are sophisticated enough to use 3rd party network providers that deliver much more differentiated services that allow more granular dynamic bandwidth...An earlier post spoke of other network SPs providing comparable service and having done so for some time... For the major LECs these service innovation things ( OK innovation is a strech) are very drawn out and for marketing people who have a vision and knowledge of what the end users wants verse what the technologists and operations folks will allow to be done with the network... getting this stuff to market for them is a challenge...I hope that the VZ partner solutions PLM folks will allow this service to bleed over ( and I do mean this figuratively)to the VZ business group and wish them all the luck in rolling it out to the enterprise. FIOS rocks!!! ( hope they dont DPI me to death!!)
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