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Optical Solutions Lights Up Corn Belt

MINNEAPOLIS -- Optical Solutions Inc. today announced that Guthrie Telecommunications Network Inc., a competitive local exchange carrier owned by Panora Cooperative Telephone Association Inc., has selected the FiberPath fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) platform from Optical Solutions to overbuild the community of Guthrie Center in West Central Iowa. Iowa is now home to two such fiber-to-the-home projects. Neighboring Huxley Cooperative Telephone Company also recently announced that it will roll out a fiber optic network to residents of Huxley, Iowa.

"Optical Solutions has a strong bond with independent telephone companies ­ they understand what our needs are, and we have an extreme level of confidence in their FTTH solutions," said Andrew Randol, general manager of Guthrie Telecommunications Network Inc.

http://www.opticalsolutions.com
optical Mike 12/4/2012 | 10:00:26 PM
re: Optical Solutions Lights Up Corn Belt With SBC's recent announcement of FTTH deployment and Alcatel getting into the PON game not only in the U.S. but in also Europe and Optical Solutions with some larger deployments like SureWest (part of Roseville Telephone who recently purchased WINFIRST assets in Sacramento CA) http://www.surewest.com/.com I believe more are finally accepting the present and long term advantages and superiority of fiber to the home.
calsurf23 12/4/2012 | 8:36:38 PM
re: Optical Solutions Lights Up Corn Belt First of all, before I get flamed out there, I approach this site from an investor's perspective, not an engineer's...
That said, my question is this - If core is reaching saturation/equilibrium, and the "next big thing" is edge routing, why is Optical Solutions the only game in town in the fiber to the home (FTTH) market? Doesn't it stand to reason that if edge routing is a multi-million (if not BILLION) dollar growth opportunity once the macro-environment improves, that FTTH would be even LARGER???
If that logic holds water, why aren't more companies moving to this space, given the increasing bandwidth demands for both business and consumers? (My own answer is that the risk isn't worth the current reward, as the large carriers are having a difficult enough time building commercial MAN's, let alone determining which residential areas to deploy against? Could that be why the two most recent releases from OS involve NEW tract build-outs, which will be used as a marketing premium by the developer of the new property?)
Any advice would be appreciated, as well as prognostications for the future!
luxPath 12/4/2012 | 8:36:30 PM
re: Optical Solutions Lights Up Corn Belt I believe that the FTTH sector has a tough near-term future. It will only be deployed in greenfield areas and then only in developments that will bear the costs--the potential market grows smaller, especially as the economy softens.

Too, laying new fiber to existing housing is currently a prescription for chapter 11. Look at the costs the cable firms have borne to deploy digital cable--and that is without any new wiring into the home (still using same coax cable--even for cable modem service).

Optical Solutions has been successful in deployments to small telco firms that server rural areas and have little competition. Indeed these firms often the sole service provider (POTS, cableTV, and Internet access) for their rural markets, and laying fiber/providing FTTH iw warrented.

Dont look for Verizon, Bellsouth, SBC, Qwest or ATT, Comcast, Cox, and TimeWarner to begin laying fiber to your houses any time soon.
DKP 12/4/2012 | 8:34:23 PM
re: Optical Solutions Lights Up Corn Belt
> why is Optical Solutions the only game
> in town in the fiber to the home (FTTH) market?

They have been around for at least 5 years with their RF PON, which is a good head start. But you can find FTTH solutions from Marconi, Lucent, World Wide Packets, Alloptic, Wave7, Terawave, etc, etc. and several other companies with solutions soon to be released. Like any market in telecom right now, it is already crowded.




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