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Mobile

Unstrung Eyes WiMax

Unstrung's latest Who Makes What report is a survey of the equipment makers and service providers involved in the world of WiMax, currently one of the hottest topics in wireless. WiMax -- in case you've been out of it for the last year and a half -- is a metropolitan area, high-speed, wireless networking technology, derived from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. (IEEE)'s 802.16 specification. Fixed wireless WiMax products that are deemed compliant by the WiMAX Forum are due out before the end of the year. Mobile infrastructure will follow in 2007.

The report looks at the chip vendors that are making suitable silicon and equipment vendors that are developing infrastructure, and it lists the carriers, large and small, that are trialing and launching WiMax-esque services around the world.

Click to view the report: Who Makes What: WiMax Equipment & Services.

So why make a survey of equipment and services available now?

Simply because many vendors haven't waited for the WiMAX Forum seal of approval but have come out with what they are calling "pre-WiMax" products, which many carriers are using -- or planning to use -- to get a first taste of broadband wireless.

As with other Who Makes What reports, we invite you to point out any WiMax infrastructure vendors or services that we have missed. Email [email protected] or post on the message board any names that you feel should be in the report.

— Dan Jones, Site Editor, Unstrung

gtamaru 12/5/2012 | 3:04:15 AM
re: Unstrung Eyes WiMax Given the hype around wireless broadband, will the upcoming WiMax initiatives provide a new "holy grail"? Why won't the big carriers want to include this in their service portfolios? Deployment costs? Interoperability issues? Technical obstacles?
stephencooke 12/5/2012 | 3:04:13 AM
re: Unstrung Eyes WiMax Short answer: telcos provide no value-add with WiMax vs. Vonage-supplied WiMax.

There are low barriers to entry for WiMax so everyone with cash could setup a WiMax-based service (bandwidth exhaust and security issues aside). This is another reason why telcos have to offer a serious package of services to remain viable.

Steve.
gtamaru 12/5/2012 | 3:04:12 AM
re: Unstrung Eyes WiMax Given WiMax's low barrier to entry and providing broadband services, why won't this cause a major paradigm shift in providing access to business enterprises and consumers? Assuming security and bandwidth are addressed. Wouldn't both the carriers and cable guys be severely impacted? Also, I'd imagine that WiMax could some day provide the "triple play" services as well, with easier last mile access.
OldPOTS 12/5/2012 | 3:04:11 AM
re: Unstrung Eyes WiMax Ask the city of Addison TX (Operating WiFi) why the RBOC & cable lobbyist are working hard to get city telco utilities made illegal.

OldPOTS

PS But I do have strong security concerns for WiMax
OldPOTS 12/5/2012 | 3:04:11 AM
re: Unstrung Eyes WiMax Ask the city of Addison TX (Operating WiFi) why the RBOC & cable lobbyist are working hard to get city telco utilities made illegal.

OldPOTS

PS But I do have strong security concerns for WiMax
0x007 12/5/2012 | 3:04:06 AM
re: Unstrung Eyes WiMax A few reasons why WiMAX will fail...

1) Unlicensed WiMAX operates at 5.8GHz which is pretty much a line of sight band frequency. Foliage and buildings present problems. It will have much poorer performance than WiFi. (No OFDM is not magic pixy dust)

2) Licensed WiMAX in the US is defined for the 2.5GHz band which is almost monopolized by Sprint/Nextel and the Catholic Church. Both outfits have lots of customers but are tough sells.

3) The equipment (radios) can never achieve the economies of scale that WiFi enjoys. WiFi is defined for the 2.4GHz band. WiMax is defined for 3 different spectrum bands with multiple channel width options, and 2 duplexing options resulting in 9 different flavors of WiMax with more to come.

4) The WiMax Forum aka Intel is held together by threads. Half want to Focus on fixed wireless while Sprint, Samsung and others are pushing mobility and at the same time sponsoring and "complementary" standard called WiBRO.

5) It will allow the government to monitor our thoughts. (Well that's just a guess)

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