x
Device operating systems

Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo

A group of former Nokia Corp. (NYSE: NOK) employees has launched a smartphone startup called Jolla Ltd. that aims to rescue the MeeGo open-source operating system from the Finnish phone maker's notoriously branded "burning platform." (See Nokia's 'Burning Platform' Memo .)

According to a Jolla press release issued over the weekend, the new independent company plans to design, develop and sell new MeeGo-based smartphones and intends to "reveal" its first device later this year, together with international private investors and partners. (See Startup Develops MeeGo Smartphones.)

Headquartered in Helsinki with an R&D office in Tampere, Finland, the company said it has been working on a new smartphone and the OS since the end of 2011 and that the OS is evolved from MeeGo, using Mer Core and Qt development tools. The company also noted, via Twitter that it is making its own new user interface for the devices.

According to the description on the company's LinkedIn page, the "Jolla team is formed by directors and core professionals from Nokia's MeeGo N9 organisation. ... The Jolla team consists of a substantial number of MeeGo's core engineers and directors, and is aggressively hiring the top MeeGo talent to contribute to the next generation smartphone production."

The startup did not provide financial details about investors or funding or even when its first product is scheduled to ship to customers.

But it did reveal who's on its management team. Jolla is led by CEO Jussi Hurmola, who previously was Nokia's director of MeeGo Computers Releases and Integration. Other members of the management team include: Dr. Antti Saarnio, chairman; Marc Dillon, COO, who was a MeeGo principal engineer at Nokia; Stefano Mosconi, CIO, who was MeeGo IT manager at Nokia; and Sami Pienimäki, VP of sales and business development, who was head of MeeGo product management at Nokia.

Nokia sidelined the MeeGo OS, which was created in partnership with Intel Corp. (Nasdaq: INTC), when it announced in early 2011 that it would focus on the Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) Windows Phone OS for all of its future smartphone development. MeeGo only showed up in one Nokia smartphone, the N9, which was released in June 2011. (See MWC 2011: Adios, MeeGo and Nokia's MeeGo N9 Starts Shipping.)

Why this matters
Jolla's MeeGo revival effort throws yet another smartphone OS into the crowded fray of those trying to take on Google (Nasdaq: GOOG)'s Android and Apple Inc. (Nasdaq: AAPL)'s iOS.

What's interesting is that Jolla's staff and investors believe that MeeGo has a viable future, while Nokia's management clearly thought otherwise.

But Jolla is not the only open-source OS development effort attempting to compete with those mobile software giants -- another is the Linux-based OS Tizen, which is backed by Intel and Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. (Korea: SEC).

A big challenge for Jolla, therefore, will be to differentiate its platform.

As for the startup's smartphone plans, Jolla will need deep pockets and strong investor backing to hold its own in the crowded, ultra-competitive high-end device market.

For more


— Michelle Donegan, European Editor, Light Reading Mobile

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Michelle Donegan 12/5/2012 | 5:28:20 PM
re: Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo

Any ideas on who's backing Jolla? They're not revealing who their private investors are yet. I'm intrigued. Can Jolla make a go of MeeGo when Nokia couldn't? 

krishanguru143 12/5/2012 | 5:28:19 PM
re: Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo



I wouldn’t put much weight onto what the management at Nokia thought.  You are talking about a management team that has gone WP or bust.  When Nokia entered into the WP market WP has a market share of 2.5%, it is now 1.9% with an every so slight increase in overall volume.  Guess what Nokia is still staying with, a platform with a shrinking market share.  Also look at their stock; it is currently at 1.49 EUR, not far from the 1.00 EUR which will start the delisting process.  On the NYSE it is currently at $1.86, not far from the $1.00 to trigger it to be delisted either.  I expect them to be delisted before the end of the quarter (sales are not going to be any better as who would be a WP7 phone when it cannot run WP8 to be released in the next few months) and when one of their stocks is delisted, the other will rapidly fall as well.

 

If MeeGo had no future then both of these wouldn’t have happened.

1)      Tizen

2)      BB copying quite a bit of the UI for BBX.

As for can they (Jolla) do what Nokia could not, not a very good question that Nokia essentially killed the OS before the first device even shipped.&nbsp; However, in the 4<sup>th</sup> quarter of 2011, Nokia sold more N9&rsquo;s than all WP shipments combined.&nbsp; So the phone sold better than all Lumia handsets and all other WP handsets as well.&nbsp; Nokia tried their best to bury the handset and released it into a small number of markets, most of which were not where you would typically target a high-end phone for.&nbsp; Imagine what would have happened if they actually tried to sell it.

&nbsp;

What happens if Jolla sells more phones than Nokia sells of WP?&nbsp; What does Elop do?&nbsp; Is Elop kept?




opticalwatcher 12/5/2012 | 5:28:18 PM
re: Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo

If we look purely at the OS, I am sure Meego has some nice features.


But it isn't the OS that matters nowdays, it is the applications that run on it, as well as the infrastructure to support the loading of applications. What does Meego offer in applications and infrastructure? Probably not even as much as WebOS or RIM's Playbook.


&nbsp;


&nbsp;

krishanguru143 12/5/2012 | 5:28:16 PM
re: Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo

&nbsp;

Well, you would be run.&nbsp; Since it is Qt based, there are tons of apps right there.&nbsp; It can also run Java and there is already a way to run Dalvik based apps on it.&nbsp; The company that made it wants to license to OEM&rsquo;s, so the end-user cannot get it.&nbsp; If you don&rsquo;t know what Dalvik is, Android apps.&nbsp; So, there are more apps for MeeGo than for WebOS or PlayBook.

&nbsp;

I would suggest you actually look at Qt and see how much it really is used.&nbsp; Even RIM uses Qt.

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

While I&rsquo;m sure they are going to continue with the Qt portion, I would expect them to license the Dalvik portion as well, which is exactly what Intel and Samsung are doing with Tizen.

&nbsp;



Also the goal is HTML5.&nbsp; This is where the industry is headed.&nbsp; The big question, how does one make money off of apps that are web based though?&nbsp; Since you are using the browser, what are they going to do, lock Internet access down?&nbsp; They could prohibit or limit offline storage but in the end, the consumers can get wise to that and move on to a different OS.&nbsp; I expect Apple to lock the iPhone down and limit HTML5 aps even though they say are openly support the standard.&nbsp; Apple &ldquo;openly&rdquo; accepts the Micro USB requirement for charging too; you need to buy an adapter though.&nbsp; I expect no different when it comes to offline HTML5 and Apple.





&nbsp;


&nbsp;

krishanguru143 12/5/2012 | 5:28:15 PM
re: Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo

YOU have it all wrong. &nbsp;In a few years, the apps will be all HTML5 and any company that requires "dedicated" apps is going to be left behind. &nbsp;You get a write once and it is for ALL platforms. &nbsp;Why would someone want to create the same app for multiple platforms when HTML5 allows a code once and forget it approach?


&nbsp;


I also see that you know nothing, NOTHING about the Alien Dalvik. &nbsp;Maybe you should educate yourself. &nbsp;Alien Dalvik has been shown on the N9 around ayear ago, the company that produced it, wants to sell to OEM's and not consumers. &nbsp;Guess what, Jolla is not Nokia qnd like Samsung, will license it. &nbsp;Why create your own ecosystem when you can use that of another? &nbsp;So no one needs to write for MeeGo but with Alien Dalvik you just use Android apps whcih run at native speeds. &nbsp;An ecosystem is a easte to have, they all have an expiration date on them and HTML5 is the end for them. &nbsp;So why would Jolla want to crate their own? &nbsp;Nokia wanted to use Qt on S40, S60 (Symbian) and MeeGo. &nbsp;So same app, all three platforms; that made sense, Jolla will just use Alien Dalvik and still support Qt.


&nbsp;


Qt doesn't need an app store. &nbsp;How much GARBAGE is on an app store? &nbsp;There are more pieces of CRAP than good apps by a margin of over 1000:1. &nbsp;A app store is designed for one single thing, revenue. &nbsp;It has nothing to do with anythign else.


&nbsp;


I could ask where is the HTML5 app store? &nbsp;Ahh, yes, the INTERNET!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

opticalwatcher 12/5/2012 | 5:28:15 PM
re: Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo

" Since it is Qt based, there are tons of apps right there. " Really? Where's this Qt app store?


lanbrown, your answer is very theoretical, which is the problem Meego (and its predecessors and successors like Tizen) have had all along. In theory it can run all kinds of apps, and can connect to all kinds of cloud based music/app store/storage systems with integration with email/Facebook/Skype, etc, etc. In theory. In theory, Linux can run Windows programs using Wine. (I have a Linux PC, so I know what this really means. I find it too much of a bother to even install wine).


RIM has worked hard to make the Playbook run Android apps, and now it can run 1000s...out of almost 500,000.


Who is going to develop for this? My local mall has an Android and IOS app for finding stores. Will they come up with a Meego one too? In theory, they can, in reality they won't.


Amazon has it right--develop the store first, then develop the phone/tablet/device. Where's Meego's server farm?


&nbsp;

paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 5:28:14 PM
re: Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo

&nbsp;


So, you are claiming that the Sensor APIs (which in fact are mostly draft proposals at this point) are going to cover all APIs available from the hardware of smartphones? &nbsp;Interesting - but I don't think so. &nbsp;Today the sensor APIs are being targeted at a handful of things. &nbsp;I tried to use a very simple example but you should take a look at how you are going to GPS information exchange with your hardware and find the APIs for that.


And if you think that simpler web applications don't often have to know what browser is being used then you are kidding yourself.


So, what you will end up with is an app that you will claim will run anywhere and will in fact have a list of supported devices. &nbsp;Which is not run anywhere and ends up being the same as we are today given that there are only two relevant OSes. &nbsp;As you yourself have pointed out - WP is not going anywhere - RIM is dead - Symbian is dead (killed whether you like it or not). &nbsp;That leaves app developers with Android and IOS. &nbsp;Nobody is going to write new apps natively for meego until there is a customer base for it.


Am I saying that there will not be HTML5 based web apps? &nbsp;No, of course not. &nbsp;There will be lots and they will be quite popular. &nbsp;Just don't expect that to dampen the flood of Android and IOS apps since there are likely to be things that can ALWAYS be done on the hardware native sooner than will be there through browser support. &nbsp;And remember there app developers only have to worry about two OSes...heck there are 3 server/desktop OSes (Linux/Windows/OSX).


seven


&nbsp;

paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 5:28:14 PM
re: Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo

Ian,


There is a huge problem with the write once use everywhere proposition you propose for HTML5.


One of the big advantages of Apps over the Web Browser is the ability to use HW capability of the platform (for example shaking an iPhone to shake the dice on a Monopoly game). &nbsp;


So web apps written for browsers will have broad and non-mobile applications as they do today. &nbsp;But specific OS written apps (and HTML5 is not an OS) are different.


seven

krishanguru143 12/5/2012 | 5:28:14 PM
re: Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo

Another 100% wrong post from you. &nbsp;Being able to tap into the sensors in the phone is already supported by HTML5, it comes down to IF the OS allows it. &nbsp;What happens if one company decides to limit that and developers decide not to write native apps? &nbsp;The industry could just move forward without them and leave them behind. &nbsp;HTML5 also supports offline storage, so the "app" was retrieved and installed to run locally.


&nbsp;


If you look around, you will see sample sites that already tap into the sensors in the phone. &nbsp;So it is already being done today!!!!!!!!!

krishanguru143 12/5/2012 | 5:28:14 PM
re: Nokia Refugees Revive MeeGo

Another 100% wrong post from you. &nbsp;Being able to tap into the sensors in the phone is already supported by HTML5, it comes down to IF the OS allows it. &nbsp;What happens if one company decides to limit that and developers decide not to write native apps? &nbsp;The industry could just move forward without them and leave them behind. &nbsp;HTML5 also supports offline storage, so the "app" was retrieved and installed to run locally.


&nbsp;


If you look around, you will see sample sites that already tap into the sensors in the phone. &nbsp;So it is already being done today!!!!!!!!!

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
HOME
Sign In
SEARCH
CLOSE
MORE
CLOSE