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Backhaul

Slideshow60GHz: A Frequency to Watch

(Source: Agilent)
(Source: Agilent)

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Shantanu Bhattacharya 7/18/2014 | 3:05:36 AM
Mobile / Backhaul : 60Ghz Frequency This story on 60Ghz has generated very interesting insight and comments ! Excellent wisdom !
DanJones 7/17/2014 | 12:29:39 PM
Re: Fills niche Its a possibility.
DanJones 7/17/2014 | 12:29:17 PM
Re: Let’s define the carrier grade backhaul Interesting comments, thanks.
danny_be 7/12/2014 | 1:22:33 PM
Let’s define the carrier grade backhaul Outdoor backhaul products are totally different from the WiGig short-range indoor ones.

As such, there are different regulation schemes for each application, and that includes Tx power, Antenna gain, modulations and channel widths and arrangements.

Most of the products available today for outdoor P2P applications were developed before the rush for the small cell backhaul era and are striving to become candidates for this promising application. Now, let's list the essential capabilities mobile operators are not going to compromise while choosing small cell backhaul solutions:
  1. Frequencies. Traditional microwave systems are operating in FDD utilizing two parallel frequencies bands with a stop band in the middle. 60GHz band was not designed as such and it is continues band. Solutions operating in FDD mode at 60GHz are actually burning valuable GHz of frequencies. Why? Because those vendors are expert in producing FDD systems. The solution is TDD. TDD enables very efficient utilization of the whole band, with 2 advantages: A. no need for stop band. B. It can adapt to the actual need of the data application (cellular and WiFi) which is clearly asymmetric. Remember efficiency.
  2. Number of Gigabit Ethernet ports. Any solution must enable connectivity for local small cell (maybe two, if you are wholesale provider backhauling more than one operator) and also need to enables cascading. So 2 are must. 3 gives even further flexibility (hub site, backhauling surveillance cameras, etc')
  3. Size and shape. The solution must be as small as possible. How small? Bear in mind the width of the street level poles and bring a solution not wider than that. It should simply blend in the environment with an ultra-small form factor. Shape. It should not look like a transmission system (you know the radiation fobia).

The solutions mentioned by Dan are all FDD, and have single (!!!) frequency channel. How can they fit at a dense urban to backhaul small dozens of small cells? Scalability and efficiency were not part of the design fundamental when those were made. Gigabit ports. Again, the solutions mentioned here all have single port and they also fail the size and shape criterion. Bear in mind: the only real small cell and street level solution, designed from scratch for dense urban environment while targeting all those important issues (and many more) is Siklu's EH-600T. Now take a look and realize what leading small cell outdoor backhaul pioneers already understood while bringing this innovative productSiklu EH600T to their trails.

Mitch Wagner 7/11/2014 | 7:45:52 PM
Re: Fills niche I wonder whether 60 MHz is an alternative to Bluetooth for personal area networks?
DanJones 7/11/2014 | 5:59:54 PM
Re: waiting for Software Defined Radio... Oh man, there's some really wild stuff going on in antenna land these days.
brookseven 7/11/2014 | 5:26:01 PM
Re: waiting for Software Defined Radio... Can I wait for software defined antennas as well?

seven

 
DanJones 7/11/2014 | 5:13:42 PM
Re: waiting for Software Defined Radio... Possible, but probably a long, long way off. Some people are considering 100GHz for longer range stuff but I haven't seen much actual work in that area beyond academic presentations.
mhhf1ve 7/11/2014 | 4:36:08 PM
waiting for Software Defined Radio... Keeping track of all the frequencies should be done with software... There have been a few projects to try software defined radio, but apparently the complexities are still a bit un-economical for practical use.

 
fgoldstein 7/11/2014 | 10:59:41 AM
Re: Fills niche 60G is unregulated because it's the peak absorption frequency of oxygen, with dry air attenuation at 14 dB/km.  Its Primary occupant is satellite-satellite communications; the atmosphere provides a nice blanket to protect it from surface users.  WiGig is a perfectly sensible way to sent a heap of bits across a room without messing up the getting-crowded 5G band.

The FCC's new ptp rules are very generous; they allow up to +30 dBm (1 watt) output and +82 dBm EIRP.  Nobody's building that yet, though, and boy would that 52 dB antenna (only 2 feet) need to be carefully aimed.  We have a bunch of Bridgewave 60G radios and they can pump a huge amount of data for half a mile or so.  But not in heavy rain -- the NMS chart of received signal strength is not a bad rainfall meter. (A cheap 5G radio makes a nice backup.) The licensed 80GHz band has slightly more rain fade but not the oxygen attenuation, so it can go a little farther in dry weather.

I keep watching for cheap ptp radios to come to this band.  Exalts are now below $10k/pair, but just as Atheros made it possible for $100 5G radios to outperform costly older ones, there's an opening for a disruptive 60G ptp radio.
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