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4G/3G/WiFi

AT&T: LTE-A Devices Go Mainstream in 2015

The first LTE-Advanced devices that take advantage of carrier aggregation will begin hitting the market late this year and will go mainstream in 2015, according to AT&T's chief strategy officer.

The devices will start to trickle out as operators begin concatenating non-contiguous spectrum bands, but it won't be a wholesale change, AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) Group President and CSO John Stankey explained Wednesday at the Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. conference. (See AT&T's Strategy Boss Puts Content First.)

The timing of launches depends on how aggressive carriers plan to be on moving to the newer antenna technology that allows for disparate frequency bands to be banded together. Stankey doesn't expect that to happen just for the sake of launching LTE-Advanced. (See Integrated Components Accelerate LTE and Uncovering More of the LTE-A Smorgasbord.)


For more on LTE's evolution, visit our mobile channel here on Light Reading.


"I expect antenna technology moves to be a little more deliberate, probably more geared towards antenna replacement or trigger replacement if you have to add a new radio band or if something wears out if it's weathered and old," he said. "You'll see devices into mainstream late this year and starting to really take off next year."

When this happens, he said it's entirely possible consumers will see peak rates double that which they get today. (See The Case for LTE-Advanced and Why You Should Care About LTE-Advanced (Eventually).)

Verizon Wireless and T-Mobile US Inc. both support carrier aggregation, albeit not full LTE-Advanced, in some handsets. Sprint Corp. (NYSE: S) has said its first 3x carrier aggregation-capable LTE-Advanced handsets will launch in the first half of 2015 ahead of its network. (See Sprint Seeds Market with LTE-A Handsets and Qualcomm Unveils New LTE-Advanced Chips.)

— Sarah Reedy, Senior Editor, Light Reading

jabailo 8/14/2014 | 3:28:02 PM
Full Circle -- to what Wimax was supposed to be Sounds like the carriers, who are no longer phone companies, but mobile computer networks, are coming back full circle from networks where data is an addendum to voice, to the Wimax style content or a true wireless broadband data network.  (Something we Clear users have had for nearly a decade now)!

But, I won't beat a dead horse.  Clearly, someone thought that what is called LTE-A should be the winner.   Enough said.   Just give us the LTE-A and we'll hope that it's as least as good as the consistent 6Mbps that Clear has been giving me, and continues to this day to deliver.   Hey, I'll wait...for the rest of the world to catch up to Wimax!

 
RitchBlasi 8/14/2014 | 2:12:13 PM
LTE-A Not being an engineer or uber-techie, I wonder what the network architecture looks like for LTE-A.  I wonder if it fits into carriers' plans to migrate to NFV platfoms or is there more stranded investment on the horizon?
sarahthomas1011 8/14/2014 | 8:48:30 AM
Heavy Reading Research For more on how the LTE-A market is shaping out, check out Heavy Reading analyst Danny Dick's blog right above me...it's a race for the infrastruture market too.

http://www.lightreading.com/mobile/4g-lte/whos-doing-best-in-lte-a/a/d-id/710335?
sarahthomas1011 8/14/2014 | 8:40:16 AM
LTE-A progress Carrier aggregation is definitely the first feature that's really taking off out of the catalog of updates that LTE-Advanced includes and trials are well underway. According to ABI Research, at the end of the first quarter this year, there were around 60 LTE-A trials, commitments and commercial deployments globally, 22 in Western Europe, 16 in Asia Pacific, and 5 in North America. Consumers should start to care about this when they have handsets that support it as well.
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