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kq4ym
kq4ym
3/14/2018 | 2:45:15 PM
Re: I am dubious.
Surveys are sometimes pretty biased even if not intentionally so. Without lots of experience and some testing, it's not usual that the sureys we come across are not measuring what the provider thinks is being asked. Time for the psychologist or social scientists to come in and make valid surveys for important matters.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
3/9/2018 | 1:41:11 AM
Re: I am dubious.
@mhh: Depends on the context and who's doing the reading.

I remember filling out a VERY lengthy survey after a far less than satisfactory stay at a particular hotel on a business trip. Lots of free-form essay answers. I expected to get some sort of apology. Nope. Nothing. It was like no one ever read it. My time was wasted, and I have limited my business with that hotel chain since.

But for free-form essay responses for public-facing reviews, like on eBay or Yelp or what-have-you, I find these quite helpful -- far more than the actual star/whatever ratings. I skim these for common threads and issues to determine if the issues others have noted are issues I would have a problem with personally.
mhhfive
mhhfive
3/8/2018 | 5:47:49 PM
Re: I am dubious.
I think that's exactly why there's been a rise in popularity of just "thumbs up" .. and if they're lucky, "thumbs down" for simply ratings. 

Even free form text boxes can be useless.. I haven't used eBay in a while.... do users still say things like "A+++ would buy again" or whatever useless reviews were commonly posted many many years ago? 
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
3/8/2018 | 3:32:10 PM
Re: I am dubious.
@mhh: The main problem of the 5-point scale, although much smaller, is that it allows for a neutral middle ground in the form of the 3rd selection.

The most useful and the most actionable data from surveys comes from not allowing people to hedge with a middle-ground option -- using a four-point scale instead, with highly specific/extreme language. Instead of, say, "Perfect/Excellent/Good/Fair/Poor" or whatever, customers really have to think about their more middling experiences to determine if they feel more positively or negatively about them.
mhhfive
mhhfive
3/6/2018 | 2:22:50 PM
Re: I am dubious.
> "Survey questions that ask you to rate something subjectively on a scale of ten- or eleven-point scale."

Even the "5-star" scale is pretty useless, even though it's pretty much everywhere. I think Youtube stopped using a "star review" system a few years ago -- and just went for "Thumbs up" or "Thumbs down" ratings to make things easier for everyone. 
Michelle
Michelle
2/28/2018 | 3:05:10 PM
Re: I am dubious.
Ugh, I've seen some of those poorly worded surveys. They are terrible and they are designed with bias (though it doesn't always seem to be on purpose, still bad).
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/27/2018 | 10:42:34 PM
Re: I am dubious.
@Michelle: Worse, we ask questions poorly -- in ways that are designed to maximize the chances of inaccuracy.

Classic example: Survey questions that ask you to rate something subjectively on a scale of ten- or eleven-point scale.

This problem has even persisted in IT, in threat assessment. This is why DREAD was revised to a three-point scale from its original ten-point scale. As Microsoft's David LeBlanc observed years ago, "what's the difference between discoverability of six and seven? Who the heck knows? I don't."
Michelle
Michelle
2/27/2018 | 1:22:43 PM
Re: I am dubious.
Indeed. Humans are generally messy and error prone. We're also pretty bad at self-awareness. This creates a lot of bad data, naturally.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/26/2018 | 9:43:23 PM
Re: I am dubious.
@Michelle: And we're not even talking about how we want others to perceive us. Sometimes, we answer survey questions with answers that we ourselves wish were true, or were once true, or that we hope to make come true -- instead of what the actual, ugly truth is.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/26/2018 | 9:42:20 PM
Re: locked
@kq4ym: For my own part, my approach is more a matter of libertarian practicality. Passwords, fundamentally, are supposed to be kept private. Your biometric features -- and especially your face -- are far from private.
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