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MatthewKNorton
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MatthewKNorton,
User Rank: Light Beer
10/27/2017 | 7:30:44 AM
Just Comment
Great post
mendyk
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mendyk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/26/2017 | 11:51:48 AM
Re: Money Talks
Right -- automating discrete parts of the network and processes has been going on for decades. The big challenge is to bring all of these bits of automation together to create an autonomous network. This will take a number of years, but one step that can be taken now is to come up with a plan for getting to that end goal. And it means prioritizing development to focus on automation.
Phil_Britt
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Phil_Britt,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/26/2017 | 11:31:09 AM
Re: Money Talks
Some companies, like Comcast, Amazon and a few others, are large enough and strategic enough to balance enough long-term thinking while still providing the short-term benefits that shareholders expect. Part of this has to do with proper, ongoing messaging about what to expect short and long-term (under promise, over delive). But there are still too many companies stuck in the "next quarter first, maybe long term later mentality.
mendyk
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mendyk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/26/2017 | 11:19:56 AM
Re: Money Talks
On the TV this morning, Brian Roberts was patting himself on the back over Kabletown's -- I mean, Comcast's -- commitment to long-term strategies. So maybe this will become a trend.
brooks7
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brooks7,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/26/2017 | 11:18:09 AM
Re: Money Talks
 

I think their is a disconnect, because I fundamentally agree with Gabriel's post.  Automation exists in large parts of the telco environment - for specific functionality.  This generally happens AFTER there is a scaled deployment of a service, but I have seen it when there is a planned scaled deployment.

They are trying to jump to the final answer and not go through the step of automation support leading to (what I call) 1 Button Bobs (functions that are scripted but under human control) to then taking over some capability in an automated way to finally full control.

seven

 

 

 
Phil_Britt
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Phil_Britt,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/26/2017 | 11:07:55 AM
Re: Money Talks
You're absolutely right. But too many U.S. corporations, in and out of telecom, are focused on quarterly numbers. The success of Netflix shows what long-term thinking can provide.

 
mendyk
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mendyk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/26/2017 | 11:01:46 AM
Re: Money Talks
Phil -- This is why skepticism -- if not pessimism -- about telco automation is in order. For this to really work, telcos need to get beyond the "piece part" phase and come up with a plan to put all this together -- not to mention the will to then execute that plan.
Gabriel Brown
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Gabriel Brown,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/26/2017 | 6:35:27 AM
Re: Carts and horses
It's worth keeping in mind operators (and the industry at large) have made massive gains from automation over the years. Two examples are:
  • Automated line testing for broadband services (they used to send an engineer to check your line); and
  • Automatic neighbor relations (ANR) for LTE cell planning in place of manual processes in 3G

There are many more examples in fixed and mobile.

This isn't a reason to slack off -- obviously, more can be done -- but to succeed going forward it's important recognize progress to date. Operators have a good track record and can shape their future.

Having done bits and pieces of work* on Machine Learning** for service provider networks over the past year, I'm incredibly excited, and confident, about automation of network operations and business operations in the telco sector.

 

 

* I've got the point where I'm realizing how little I know ;)

** ML in CAPS because it's the new thing 
Phil_Britt
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Phil_Britt,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/26/2017 | 6:34:09 AM
Money Talks
Rightly or wrongly, financial imperatives will likely continue to drive automation decisions. The quicker a company can expect to receive an ROI, the quicker it will add automation. What others are doing always takes a back seat, which is why sometimes start-ups are first movers -- too many approvals needed in the corporate structures of larger firms.
Carol Wilson
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Carol Wilson,
User Rank: Blogger
10/25/2017 | 5:13:34 PM
Re: Carts and horses
I agree that the most jarring aspect is that they aren't in control of their own destiny on that front. Every operator has hundreds of reasons why they can't get to the level of automation they need, but it's starting not to matter. 
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