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iotman 6/5/2017 | 7:16:11 PM
Interoperability As I mentioned a few weeks ago......nb-iot IODT is almost completed. Please put to bed these myths around "two versions" of NB-IOT. It is one standard, as it was always intended to be.

 

http://www.silicon.co.uk/networks/vodafone-nb-iot-213835

 

 
SystemEn18668 5/28/2017 | 11:30:58 PM
NB-IOT vs SigFox vs LoRA Delay standardization, price and vendors not being open to each other, Are we heading to evolution of another open standard based deployments similar to Wi-Fi in access? 
Director53355 5/28/2017 | 3:08:52 PM
Re: Clarification Ian, as told before: "If a sales guy will tell me that he cannot sell NB-IoT modules in a price range between USD 5 and USD 10 then I will fire him."
The price level of today is already okay and the price is not all. 
Director53355 5/28/2017 | 3:04:30 PM
NB-IoT price and limitations in licence free band Ian, sorry but I do not agree with your article. The price for NB-IoT modules is already less than USD 10 – since months. I am not the Oracle of Delphi, but I am more than 20 years in GSM and GPS. A combined GSM / Bluetooth module I can offer in the USD 5 USD range to you.  Moreover, it comes with an RTOS and gives you the freedom to run the code on the module. GSM module has a TX power of 33 dBm. For 33 dBm you have to spend an external power amplifier in front of the chip. NB-IoT modules have to support 23 dBm only. The 23 dBm you can generate on the main NB-IoT chipset. Based on that the bill of material of an NB-IoT module is always cheaper than a bill of material of a GSM module. The USD 5 or even less is realistic.

"Thomas Nicholls, Sigfox's executive vice president of communications, told Light Reading that he expected the cost of a Sigfox module to fall from about $2 then to as little as $0.50 over the subsequent five years."

I was in the sales of ISM chipsets and I know what is inside an SIGFOX module. The USD 2 modules are based on a System on Chip with an ISM Transceiver, MCU (license free 8051 derivatives), a crystal and a matching circuit. USD 0.50 minus 15% margin for the manufacturer and distributor means USD 0.36 production costs including upper mentioned parts, PCB, metal can, pic and place, testing and assembling on tape on wheel. What support and service level the IoT developers can expect on 15% margin? We talk about RF development, antenna matching and radio certifications.
Ian, the USD 0.50 are not realistic.

"The difference between that and $5 is a gigantic amount of business cases,"
The cheapest car in Germany was the Trabant. They closed the factory doors in 1990.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trabant
Porsche is still selling well. Price is not all. Often you get what you pay for. All these ISM technologies called LoRa or SIGFOX want to make business in a small 600 KHz frequency gap in the unlicensed frequency band. What will happen if two LoRaWAN BTS, one SIGFOX BTS, sensor networks and our garage door openers will start to transmit unsynchronised without listening before talking? My personal opinion is that the cheap dream will end in a collapse in the unlicensed band and some new rules at RED.

>"Sigfox has previously boasted a huge advantage over NB-IoT on equipment costs and seems likely to maintain that advantage even if NB-IoT can hit the $5 target."
Sorry but this is wrong twice. We will undercut the USD 5. What is your dream car? A Trabant or a Porsche? SIGFOX has many technical limitations and based on that they will not meet the needs of many IoT applications.

> "Currently, many operators support M2M services on GPRS, an ageing 2G network technology. If they cannot move customers onto 4G-based alternatives, like NB-IoT, they will have either to ditch those contracts or to continue investing in increasingly outdated systems."
The toll system in Germany is based on GSM/GPRS. A lot of metering applications are on GPRS. The European eCall is based on GSM and fall back on incoming calls on smartphones is GSM. GPRS will stay a long time alive. It will be limited in the frequency range, but I will not get a sunset. If you tell Asia, then you tell nothing, because it is a continent and no country.

As I told, I am 20+ years in GSM and GPS. We sold GPRS modules for USD 20+. If a sales guy will tell me that he cannot sell NB-IoT modules in a price range between USD 5 and USD 10 then I will fire him. With NB-IoT we can make a lot of application real, that we cannot do with GPRS or SIGFOX. Frankly spoken I am tired of reading about price as a benefit repeatedly. Porsche, BMW and Daimler sell well without talking about price level.

If you or a reader has a need a for a USD 5 offer, then do not hesitate to drop an email to me harald.naumann (at) lte-modem.com
iainmorris 5/27/2017 | 4:32:29 AM
Re: anti nb-iot articles will look silly in coming months It is not an "anti-NB-IoT" article, as you say, and does actually point out the challenges surrounding LoRa and Sigfox and that many industry observers expect NB-IoT to succeed in the long run, despite challenges it faces right now. If people make comments at trade shows, that is what we report - because that is what reporters do. And if the interoperabilty issue is a "myth," it is one that a number of experts and industry figures have bought into, and therefore that Ericsson and Huawei have not done enough to dispel. It was even mentioned in a keynote at the LPWA World event this week. People aren't convinced it isn't a problem, basically, and that in itself is a problem. As the author of the story, I would be very happy to be contacted ([email protected]) if you would like to discuss in more detail - you sound potentially like one of the sources you suggest we should be getter closer to!
iainmorris 5/27/2017 | 4:32:29 AM
Re: anti nb-iot articles will look silly in coming months It is not an "anti-NB-IoT" article, as you say, and does actually point out the challenges surrounding LoRa and Sigfox and that many industry observers expect NB-IoT to succeed in the long run, despite challenges it faces right now. If people make comments at trade shows, that is what we report - because that is what reporters do. And if the interoperabilty issue is a "myth," it is one that a number of experts and industry figures have bought into, and therefore that Ericsson and Huawei have not done enough to dispel. It was even mentioned in a keynote at the LPWA World event this week. People aren't convinced it isn't a problem, basically, and that in itself is a problem. As the author of the story, I would be very happy to be contacted ([email protected]) if you would like to discuss in more detail - you sound potentially like one of the sources you suggest we should be getter closer to!
iotman 5/26/2017 | 4:51:02 PM
anti nb-iot articles will look silly in coming months We already have commitment for 8USD modules from multiple vendors for MOQ as little as 1000. These are available right now. They are also using latest chipsets with optimization (Release Assistance) that put nb1 power consumption equal to or better than lorawan (for payloads 100 bytes or more). The author here needs to get some better intelligence , as those close to this know how real the networks will be in the coming months. The US carriers are also softening their CAT M stance and are all likely to include nb1 in near future as they realize it's the optimum solution for millions of battery powered devices. I'm constantly amused by these light reading articles! Also, the whole interoperability between the two versions of nb1 is also a complete myth....the vendors have almost completed full testing and all nb1 modules (based on huawei chipset) will be fully interoperable from June 17 (I know as we are already testing these). The author needs to get closer to the technology and closer to the sources to report more accurately. Rag
iainmorris 5/26/2017 | 12:05:25 PM
Clarification This story has been updated since it was first published to point out that a module cost of $5 is a broad industry objective, and not a Deutsche Telekom goal specifically, and that prices need to fall closer to $5 -- but not be at $5 -- to fuel more interest in NB-IoT. 
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