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Carol Wilson
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Carol Wilson,
User Rank: Blogger
4/19/2017 | 2:01:00 PM
Re: Diagnosis
I get what you are saying but the work that AT&T, Vodafone and others are doing is pushing in the direction of Facebook and Google. 

I disagree that telcos want open source primarily to reduce capex and what they are spending on equipment - that's a goal, to be sure, but what I hear over and over from them is the need to scale more rapidly to meet bandwidth demands and to introduce new services faster. Not a single major CTO with whom I've spoken thinks virtualization will reduce their capex budgets any time soon. 

 
brooks7
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brooks7,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/19/2017 | 1:41:45 PM
Re: Diagnosis
 

Carol,

I think you misunderstood my daily updates.  Ask Verizon if they could introduce new packages from their vendors in 24 hours and put them live to their market.  The time to test and approve things is months not hours.  Very different timeframes.  The Scrum methodology produces 2 week product release cycles for new features.  Facebook and Google basically did what I said...picked their vendors (sometimes it was them) and just DID.  They didn't wait for standards development.  They did try to get what they were doing standardized, but only at the very bottom end of things (like component specs).

By the way, I don't think that this has anything to do with what the telcos want.  What they want is to reduce capex.  They want open source because they would like to eliminate the spending on equipment.  That is NOT why the IT groups do virtualization.  They do it for fast service creation and flexibility.  Facebook's (and Google and Amazon) have the load on their network change daily with the movement around the Earth by the Sun.  It is either be flexible or double the amount of equipment in each data center.  THAT is their CAPEX reduction.   The say AT&T equivalent is that they have 4 voice switches in the US and they use the West Coast Data Center to cover overflow on the East Coast Data Center every day from 8 - 11AM.   Now scale that up and voila...now you are starting to talk.  Of course, none of this works if you have to have special network arrangements or any oddball protocols.  You want to use DNS publishing and load balancers to make this work.  Imagine if your local phone call was actually handled in the early morning by a switch that was based in California.  That is pretty much like making the equivalent of loading up google.com and thinking you know where the server you are actually connected to for that TCP connection is located.

seven

 
Carol Wilson
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Carol Wilson,
User Rank: Blogger
4/19/2017 | 11:39:30 AM
Re: Diagnosis
Brooks7,

How do you view the way Facebook and Google are using virtualization - I see CSPs much more interested in emulating their processes, which do include daily updates. 

I totally agree on the vendor issue - what I am hearing from operators is that the vendors are resisting the kinds of pricing restructuring that is needed because it forces them to completely redo their business plans. 

It was mentioned many times at ONS a few weeks back - the folks being expected to enact the change have no incentive to do so. 
brooks7
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brooks7,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/19/2017 | 10:50:58 AM
Diagnosis
 

I think there is exactly one problem.  You can not take a technology and in fact an entire infrasructure that was built to be used in one way and then decide that the entire industry would change to do it another. 

The virtualization deployment that we see in the IT world grew up organically and all the stuff that you talk about that is hard or expensive is already addressed.  The problem is that this model was completely rejected.  I have run a SaaS operation and it works nothing like a carrier.  I think people need to think Scrum and Agile.  10 groups have products out before the Telcos have an approved business plan.

This is not a world where standardization and interoperability matter in the least.  Neither does bugs in Open Source.  You start with those things and then your software team patches the Open Source and integrates things into a product.  The fact there is a standards body or 2 or 3 means that this whole effort is a failure. 

Then there is a second problem.  What is the gain for the telco vendors to make their products even lower price?  To take full advantage of a Virtual Environment, vendors would have to redo their products from scratch.  How is that supposed to work economically?

So if I back up to what worked so well on the IT front, essentially a couple of services are built this way out of a common set of core blocks that are used by lots of folks (LAMP Stack + VMware).  On top of the web scale providers do their own thing to make it work in their specific situation.  Each of these services are run and implemented in a way that is very different than what telcos are used to.  I have personally updated the software that operated the service we ran more than 1 time in a day (we had about 3.5M end users).  Imagine that in Verizon or AT&T.

seven

 

 
mendyk
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mendyk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/19/2017 | 10:09:48 AM
Woeful
The telecom industry is at the heart of the 21st-century global economy. There's no Google, no Amazon, no nothin' without CSPs enabling all this digital transformation stuff. And yet right now this sector gives off a distinct Cleveland Browns vibe. Woe is us. We can't win. We're stuck in a two-bit role. Nobody likes us, and nobody is helping us. Enough already. Transformation is hard. It requires work, and commitment, and patience, and money. Those are all factors that CSPs can do something about. Whining accomplishes nothing positive.
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