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brooks7
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brooks7,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/29/2017 | 11:04:19 AM
Re: They do so anyway. But some still gives opt out.
"FCC was trying to reclassify the Internet as a service under Title II of the Telecommunication Act."

 

Correction...the FCC DID reclassify Internet Service under Title II.

seven

 
kevin.richards
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kevin.richards,
User Rank: Light Beer
4/29/2017 | 7:57:03 AM
They do so anyway. But some still gives opt out.
FTC is the only federal agency that deals with the issues of competition jurisdiction and consumer protection in broad sectors of the economy. FCC was trying to reclassify the Internet as a service under Title II of the Telecommunication Act. Being the 'information services' FCC shouldn't have reclassified it under Title II. The result was the contradiction between privacy framework of two distinct agencies.

The privacy rules of FCC are geared more towards phone services and not the Internet. The rules didn't fit so FCC attempted to write the Internet specific regulations. So it was bound to happen sooner or later which would result in the authority over privacy.

Well, the repealed legislation probably would have not been active at first place imo. Even if you use HTTPS encryption, ISPs still can track the websites you visit and most advertisers already have this information since the beginning. 

However, the rigorous changes if allowed to go through would stifle the industry's use of data and makes a less safe environment. If you are really about your information not being safe and looking for ways to hide your browser history from ISPs then your best option is to use Virtual Private Networks. However, most ISPs are still open about you opting out of any data use and gives you control to do so.
kq4ym
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kq4ym,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/11/2017 | 8:59:29 AM
Re: Dual libertarian approaches
Things at regulator's offices are certainly  going to be a bit surprising over the next four years I would guess. As "nobody seems to be able to make convincingly is why repealing privacy regulations is good for consumers," it doesn't seem to matter in the minds of industry and the new urge to lesson regulations for businesses in the next years. It will be interesting to watch if there's enough of a consumer reaction to modify some of this movement.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/30/2017 | 8:08:03 PM
Re: War is peace
I talk to these PR people all the time, and it's hard enough to get these noodleheads to give a straight answer that directly addresses the question when the question isn't an uncomfortable one!
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/30/2017 | 8:05:23 PM
Re: Dual libertarian approaches
"The FTC AND FCC's oversight authority will both ultimately be on the chopping block."

In the case of the FTC, that *will* not happen.  The FTC still regulates against "unfair and deceptive trade practices" -- among a zillion other things -- as pertaining to all businesses/industries.  (The states have this authority too unto themselves.)  The FTC Act is *not* going away anytime soon.
R Clark
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R Clark,
User Rank: Blogger
3/30/2017 | 6:55:49 PM
War is peace
The industry's messaging is possibly more disturbing than the change in regulation.

Here's an Intercept reporter's funny-if-it-weren't-so-sad attempts to ask how this helps consumer privacy.

https://theintercept.com/2017/03/29/i-spent-a-week-trying-to-make-internet-providers-answer-a-simple-question-about-selling-your-data/
KBode
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KBode,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/30/2017 | 3:36:43 PM
Re: Dual libertarian approaches
"Personally, though, I think legislation is a better and more solid and sustainable approach than regulation.  It'd be nice to see legislation from Congress on privacy protections -- and then see the FTC step up its enforcement game."

I think it's important not to fool ourselves. The goal here is little to no oversight of this industry down the road, solely to maximize revenues at the cost of consumer welfare. The FTC AND FCC's oversight authority will both ultimately be on the chopping block.

We MIGHT see Congress finally pass a rule down the road, but only after some large ISP gets caught doing something incredibly stupid. Even then, with this cash-soaked Congress, there's no guarantee.

These FCC rules were relatively simple and while not perfect, would have provided a layer of protection the FTC (which many ISPs can dodge oversight from via common carrier exemption) can't and won't provide down  the road.

This vote was a god-damned embarrassment this week.  
KBode
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KBode,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/30/2017 | 3:33:54 PM
Re: Push <-> Push
"I expect that VPNs, browser proxies, and TOR will see a sharp increase over the next year. The more intrusive companies and governments become, the less available information becomes. We saw that with HTTPS Everywhere, Let's Encrypt, and similar movements after the Snowden disclosures."


Of course many of these tools don't fix things like Verizon installing stealth bloatware on your device, or AT&T and Comcast charging more to opt out of data collection. Tools help, but these rules were useful -- especially as these companies merge and consolidate in the wake of less regulatory oversight overall. 
colnelb
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colnelb,
User Rank: Lightning
3/30/2017 | 3:01:27 PM
Will ISPs now charge end users for services like Google
If the reason for the roll back of the Internet Privacy rules regarding the ISPs was to give them a more level playing field with the on line services providers like Google, will the ISPs start charging the end users the same amount that Google does, nothing.  I doubt it.  I tend to think that the data that the ISPs can now collect and sell will be considered to be a wind fall profit which the end user will see little benefit from.  One can say that this is a Libertarian approach to government, but it is deffinately a big business approach to government at the expense and danger to the consumer.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/30/2017 | 2:16:55 PM
Re: Push <-> Push
@macemoneta: But, of course, anyone who uses those technologies must be up to no good,  right?  ◔_◔
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