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rgrutza600
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rgrutza600,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/26/2017 | 4:56:31 AM
Re: What should consumer do to portect the data from FCC
I don't appreciate your not so subtle advertising in the comments section.  This comment should be pulled.
Carol Wilson
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Carol Wilson,
User Rank: Blogger
3/25/2017 | 12:11:56 PM
Re: Privacy...
Karl, 

I get what you are saying, but I don't completely agree. I do see this as the influence of money in politics - no doubt there. But I also think the existing rules offered only partial protection and did serve to give consumers a false sense of security. 

The rules didn't distinguish between data used to benefit consumers and selling data to benefit the carrier. I have seen many different demonstrations of services that would greatly benefit consumers, based on using a combination of data about them including browsing history - those become impossible or much less likely to develop if the operators are encumbered by rules regarding data usage. 

And there was no accompanying effort to restrict how Google or Facebook uses our data and I personally believe that usage is much more invasive and of less benefit to me. That gave the telecom and cable industry an argument to make - if we are going to protect privacy, why not really protect it?

I believe the existing rules were a half-assed effort, and weren't going to accomplish real protection for consumers at all. 
KBode
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KBode,
User Rank: Light Sabre
3/24/2017 | 3:13:53 PM
Privacy...
"As my colleague, Mari Silbey, pointed out to me recently, the Senate vote to withdraw the privacy rules means that, unless something changes, by law no agency has jurisdiction over broadband privacy.

That sounds like a bad thing -- but is it?"

Yes. Let's be clear, the over-arching goal here is little to no real oversight of one of the less competitive markets in America. And that vote yesterday was a pure example of the influence of money in politics.

The rules were arguably basic, simply requiring that data collection was clearly disclosed, and users were given working opt out tools (opt in if talking about browing history or financial data).

ISPs could have self-regulated on this front. Instead they decided to try and charge a premium for privacy (AT&T), or covertly modify packets to track users around the internet with A. telling them or B. providing working opt out tools (Verizon).

That vote was an embarrassment. These rules were arguably simple, and quite useful for consumers.

 


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